Interpersonal Sensitivity: Theory and Measurement

By Judith A. Hall; Frank J. Bernieri | Go to book overview

Two additional findings are worth noting. First, women's judgmental accuracy scores were significantly higher than men's, suggesting that women on average are better judges of strangers' personality traits than men. This finding is consistent with a large body of conceptually related research that demonstrates women are better than men at decoding nonverbal behavior (Hall, 1978). Second, on two separate measures, judges' self-ratings of ability to accurately judge others were unrelated to their judgmental accuracy scores. These results mirror those found in the empathic accuracy literature and suggest that, in general, people do not possess valid self-knowledge about their ability to judge the personality traits of others (Ickes, 1993; Riggio & Riggio, chap. 7, this volume).


SUMMARY

This chapter presented a number of issues that in our opinion need to be considered when conducting judgmental accuracy research. The methodological issues pertain to (a) selection of targets, (b) criteria to assess judgmental accuracy, (c) Cronbach's components, (d) need for wide range of data, and (e) the types of judgmental accuracy. We noted that, historically, judgmental accuracy research has been atheoretical and that recent theoretical frameworks should help to correct this limitation. Vogt and Colvin' (1999) study was discussed to indicate how these various issues might actually be dealt with in an empirical study. Finally, we mentioned only briefly the topic that lay people always want to know, “Can you teach me to be a better judge?” Training people to be better judges may be the ultimate goal of this research, but the first priorities are to search for and identify the characteristics of the good judge and to learn more about the cognitive-perceptual processes associated with judgmental accuracy.


REFERENCES

Allport, G. W. (1937). Personality: A psychological interpretation. New York: Holt.

Ambady, N., Hallahan, M., & Rosenthal, R. (1995). On judging and being judged accurately in zero-acquaintance situations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 518–529.

Baddeley, A. (1995). Working memory. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The cognitive neurosciences (pp. 755–764). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bakan, D. (1966). The duality of human existence. Chicago: Rand McNally.

Bender, I. E., & Hastorf, A. H. (1950). The perception of persons: Forecasting another person's responses on three personality scales. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 45, 556–561.

Bernieri, F. J., Zuckerman, M., Koestner, R., & Rosenthal, R. (1994). Measuring person perception accuracy: Another look at self-other agreement. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 20, 367–378.

Bernstein, W. M., & Davis, M. H. (1982). Perspective-taking, self-consciousness, and accuracy in person perception. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 3, 1–19.

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