Interpersonal Sensitivity: Theory and Measurement

By Judith A. Hall; Frank J. Bernieri | Go to book overview

found to be associated with improved personal and social adjustment. Research findings support this assumption (Garfield, Raue, & Castonguay, 1998; Kiesler, 1996).


CONCLUSION

The DANVA2 assesses the ability to identify emotion without a stated context. However, we are aware of the fact that nonverbal communication is very much affected by the context within which it takes place. To this end, the ability to identify emotions nonverbally could also be examined within various social contexts. This could be accomplished in a number of ways. For example, ecologically valid social or academic situations could be described to a child and the child be shown a photograph or hear a tonal message from the DANVA2. After seeing or hearing the stimulus, the child could be asked to decide whether the stimulus was appropriate for that situation or which of a variety of possible nonverbal stimuli would be consistent with the described situation. Such approaches would give additional information about the social knowledge possessed by children. However, it still would not assess children's social skill. Children could be accurate on the DANVA2 and know what is the socially correct response to a particular social situation and still fail interpersonally because they are not skilled enough to produce the correct set of behaviors. On the other hand, children could possess social knowledge and social skill, but if they lacked the ability to identify basic emotions nonverbally, then they still would be at risk for social failure because they would be mistakenly applying their social knowledge and skill to the wrong emotional cue. There are so many ways to fail interpersonally that it is surprising that children succeed as often as they do socially.

Nonverbal sensitivity is just beginning to be recognized as an important basic social skill necessary for forming satisfactory relationships. With this recognition comes the responsibility not only to develop adequate assessment procedures to help identify those individuals who lack this crucial interpersonal skill, but once the deficit is discovered, to construct effective interventions to deal with this difficulty. Without effective nonverbal processing abilities the goal of developing satisfactory relationships with others becomes all the more difficult.


REFERENCES

Achenbach, T. (1991). The Child Behavior Checklist. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont, Department of Psychiatry.

Argyle, M. (1988). Bodily communication. New York: International Universities Press.

Axelrod, L. (1982). Social perception in learning disabled adolescents. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 15, 610–613.

Baum, K.M. (1997). Emotion perception in adolescents with schizotypal personality disorder. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Emory University, Atlanta.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpersonal Sensitivity: Theory and Measurement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 378

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.