Perspectives on Thinking, Learning, and Cognitive Styles

By Robert J. Sternberg; Li-Fang Zhang | Go to book overview

workshops, but also whenever departments or course teams are reviewing their practice as part of normal course development or quality assurance procedures (van Driel, Verloop, Van Werven, & Dekkers, 1997).

The dilemma facing both educational developers and student advisers is how best to bring together experience and conceptual frameworks. Conceptions cannot be changed simply by presenting alternatives, and experience will not lead to change unless it is interpreted against a broader framework of understanding. Such is the paradox at the heart of this situation. Conceptual change seems to depend on engagement with experience in ways that promote reflection, and this is true for both staff and students. How to achieve this is, however, much less clear.


References

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Entwistle, N. J. (1994, June). Generative concepts and pedagogical fertility: Communicating research findings on student learning. Presidential address to the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction. EARLI News, 9–15.

Entwistle, N.J. (1995). Frameworks for understanding as experienced in essay writing and in preparing for examinations. Educational Psychologist, 30, 47–54.

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