Time and Intimacy: A New Science of Personal Relationships

By Joel B. Bennett | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I have benefited from the conversations and support of many over the ten years that it took to complete this book. Special recognition goes to Steve Duck for his early encouragement and continuous commitment throughout the various twists and turns of this project. Joseph E. McGrath, Richard Archer, and Ted Huston also provided helpful encouragement during the early phases. I have also been fortunate to have colleagues—Randy Cornelius, Andrea Birch, and Karen Prager—who read through some version of the manuscript and provided many helpful tips. Along the way, different friends—especially Duane Piety and George Daughtery—listened and provided needed intellectual support to help me flesh out ideas. More recently, the format and readability of the manuscript has benefited from technical support provided by Jim Dodson, Janna M. Franzwa, and Nancy J. Bartosek. Thanks guys! I also wish to thank Jan Bennett, Sandhya Rao and Shawn Reynolds for helping out with indexing.

The above acknowledgements reflect my gratitude to those who helped me with my ideas and their communication to others. Special recognition goes to Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. and Linda Bathgate for making these ideas a printed reality.

I am also grateful to those teachers along the path who either aided in my spiritual growth or bolstered my confidence enough to find the way to express the “deeper” idea. These teachers have included Michele Katz, Robert C. Neville, Oscar Ichazo, Richard J. Davidson, Jack Kornfeld, Janet Taylor Spence, and Anne Wilson Schaef.

I do not think I could write, and complete, a book about intimacy without having actually had some experience of it. For their love and guidance, I thank my mother, Jane Shapiro Bennett (1931–1977), and my father, Gerald Stanley Bennett. I am most grateful to my wife Jan for her love, patience, and companionship.

-xxi-

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