Evolving Practices in Human Resource Management: Responses to a Changing World of Work

By Allen I. Kraut; Abraham K. Korman | Go to book overview

also increases. The goal of performance management is improved employee performance. This implies that employees must see value in the results of the review and accept the feedback to direct them toward changing in order to be more effective. Thus, as the need for acceptance of appraisal results increases, it is more important to create a system that is perceived as fair and useful.

When the outcomes of the performance management process become more valuable to the organization, there is a greater need for the organization to use the process on an ongoing basis. Rather than conducting appraisals once or twice a year, organizations can benefit from conducting them as often as practical or whenever significant assignments are completed. If performance management including appraisal is woven into the fabric of managers' everyday duties and responsibilities, it is more likely that managers will engage in it on a continuous basis and thereby provide feedback and coaching to employees as needed (for example, monthly or quarterly). In the fast-paced competitive world in which most global businesses run today, ongoing performance management is a valuable tool for staying on course or changing direction, as the marketplace demands. As the value of this process increases, the use of this system is likely to increase as well.

Indeed, cultural change and organizational transformation are unlikely to occur without new values being introduced into the performance management system. Declarations by senior management are insufficient to drive the new behaviors needed for cultural change; rather, these behaviors must be embedded in the performance fabric and woven into daily efforts and priorities. We believe that performance management can be the real glue in organizations by bonding together all the elements of organizational success into a single, aligned process that channels employee performance toward the same organizational goals and reinforces and maintains that alignment through reward and recognition programs. If the power of this tool can be harnessed and used to the fullest, then organizations can better their chances of success in a highly competitive business world.


References

Arthur, M. B., & Rousseau, D. M. (Eds.). (1996). The boundaryless career.

New York: Oxford University Press.

Banks, C. G. (1997). Performance management in the twenty-first century. Paper

-143-

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