Acheson and Empire: The British Accent in American Foreign Policy

By John T. McNay | Go to book overview

6

The Iran Connection

In October 1952, U.S. policy toward Iran was in shambles. The moderate, pro-Western prime minister, Ali Razmara, had recently been assassinated by an Iranian nationalist, and his radical, unpredictable successor, Mohammed Mossadeq, had severed diplomatic relations with Britain and nationalized the British-owned Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC). This series of catastrophes came on the heels of a long effort by Secy. of State Dean Acheson to shore up the long-tottering position of Britain in Iran, and keep Iran, which shared a border with the Soviet Union, under the umbrella of the Western alliance. “I think this tragedy can be laid at the feet of Mr. Acheson, ” exclaimed an exasperated Henry F. Grady, who had recently resigned as ambassador to Iran. Grady's resignation expressed his frustration over the shortsightedness of Acheson's policy of deferring to British concerns in Iran and the failure of President Harry S. Truman to heed Grady's warnings about that policy. “If Acheson tells Truman the moon is made of green cheese, ” Grady exclaimed, “Truman believes it.” For fourteen months Grady had struggled with Washington and London alike over the terms of a new agreement on the division of AIOC revenues between Britain and Iran. He had likewise fought for Anglo-American support for Razmara, and warned Washington of the perils of allowing the British to set the terms of its dealings with Iran. “Had Britain and the United States backed Razmara, the former Iranian Prime Minister who was a friend of the West and who was fighting the nationalization movement, this present situation would not have developed. Nor would Razmara have been assassinated, ” Grady said. “During my tenure as ambassador to Iran I made at least half a dozen recommendations, all of which were ignored or flatly turned down by our government, under British influence and insistence.” Throughout that time, the United States had leverage with the British because of greater financial and other resources, but “we just yielded” to British intransigence, Grady complained.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Acheson and Empire: The British Accent in American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Acheson and Empire - The British Accent in American Foreign Policy *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Champion of Empire 11
  • 2 - The Special Relationship 39
  • 3 - Bonds of Loyalty 61
  • 4 - The Ulster Connection 81
  • 5 - The Kashmir Connection 101
  • 6 - The Iran Connection 129
  • 7 - The Egypt Connection 158
  • 8 - Epilogue 193
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.