CHAPTER 8
Security and Democracy in South
Korean Development
Victor Cha

This chapter explores the causal linkages between two critical variables in the modern development of the Republic of Korea (ROK): security and democracy. Two questions drive this research inquiry. The first is an empirical investigation of the impact of security on the democratization process. In particular, how has the ROK's defense thinking, practice, and institutions helped or hindered the democratization and consolidation process in the 1990s (i.e., during the Kim Young Sam and Kim Dae Jung governments)? The second question is more conceptual in nature. How does the legacy of Korea's military-authoritarianism affect the democratic consolidation process? Although the military as an institution has been rooted out of politics, to what extent does the South Korean political culture still harbor within it a residual affinity for aspects of its authoritarian past?

I emphasize that this is a first foray into this topic. Although there has been voluminous literature on democratic consolidation and on security, 1 there has been relatively little that attempts to understand the explicit causal links between the two in the Korean context.2

____________________
1
There is, of course, a vast theoretical literature on transitional democracy that looks in particular at how the military plays in regime transitions. See Juan J. Linz and Alfred Stepan, Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1996); Samuel Huntington, The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991); and Alfred Stepan, Rethinking Military Politics: Brazil and the Southern Cone (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998).
2
For example, in a recent high-profile volume on democratic consolidation in Korea, the collection of essays focused on virtually every aspect of democracy (e.g., media, chaebols, civil society) except security (see Larry Diamond and Doh Chull Shin, eds., Institutional Reform and Democratic Consolidation in Korea (Stanford, CA: Hoover Press, 2000). Other important works that look at Korea's democratization in a larger context include Chungin Moon and Jongryn Mo, eds., Democratization and Globalization in Korea: Assessments and Prospects (Seoul: Yonsei University Press, 1999); Samuel Kim, ed., Korea's Globalization (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000); Young Whan Kihl, “Democratisation and Foreign Policy, ” and Chung-in Moon and Kang Mun-gu, “Democratic Opening and Military Intervention in South Korea: Comparative Assessment and Implications, ” both in Politics and Policy in the New Korean State, ed. James Cotton (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995).

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Korea's Democratization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.