English as a Global Language

By David Crystal | Go to book overview

1
Why a global language?

'English is the global language.'

A headline of this kind must have appeared in a thousand newspapers and magazines in recent years. 'English Rules' is an actual example, presenting to the world an uncomplicated scenario suggesting the universality of the language's spread and the likelihood of its continuation.1 A statement prominently displayed in the body of the associated article, memorable chiefly for its alliterative ingenuity, reinforces the initial impression: 'The British Empire may be in full retreat with the handover of Hong Kong. But from Bengal to Belize and Las Vegas to Lahore, the language of the sceptred isle is rapidly becoming the first global lingua franca.' Millennial retrospectives and prognostications continued in the same vein, with several major newspapers and magazines finding in the subject of the English language an apt symbol for the themes of globalization, diversification, progress and identity addressed in their special editions.2 Television programmes and series, too, addressed the issue, and achieved world-wide audiences.3 Certainly, by the turn of the century, the topic must have made contact

____________________
1
Globe and Mail, Toronto, 12 July 1997.
2
Ryan (1999).
3
For example, Back to Babel, a four-part (four-hour) series made in 2001 by Infonation, the film-making centre within the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, had sold to sixty-four countries by 2002. The series was notable for its range of interviews eliciting the attitudes towards English of users in several countries. It was also the first series to devote a significant part of a programme to the consequences for endangered languages (see below, p. 20). The series became available, with extra footage, on DVD in 2002: www.infonation.org.uk.

-1-

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English as a Global Language
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vii
  • Preface to the Second Edition ix
  • Preface to the First Edition xii
  • 1 - Why a Global Language? 1
  • 2 - Why English? The Historical Context 29
  • 3 - Why English? The Cultural Foundation 72
  • 4 - Why English? The Cultural Legacy 86
  • 5 - The Future of Global English 123
  • References 192
  • Index 202
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