Economic Theory and Global Warming

By Hirofumi Uzawa | Go to book overview

Introduction
Global Warming: Problems and Perspectives

1. INTRODUCTION

The relations between the environment and processes of economic development have in recent years become increasingly complex. This is primarily due to the accelerated pace of economic development in many parts of the world in the last several decades, as manifested by the rapid rates at which basic statistical indicators such as gross domestic product, the volumes of industrial outputs, and the degree of urbanization have been increasing (see, e.g., World Bank 1999). This phenomenon is also closely related to the institutional arrangements, both in capitalist and former socialist countries, concerning the allocation of both privately owned and publicly managed resources.

During the last three decades, in particular, we have also seen a significant change in the nature of the social, economic, and cultural impacts on the natural environment during the processes of economic development. This is symbolically illustrated by the agendas of two international conferences convened by the United Nations – the Stockholm Conference in 1972, on the one hand, and the Rio Conference in 1992, on the other.

The Stockholm Conference was primarily concerned with the degradation of the natural environment and the ensuing health hazards caused by the processes of industrialization during the 1960s. Then the degradation of the natural environment was mainly caused by the emission of chemical substances such as sulfur oxides and nitrogen

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Theory and Global Warming
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Global Warming: Problems and Perspectives 1
  • 1 - Global Warming and Carbon Taxes 22
  • 2 - Pareto Optimality and Social Optimum 60
  • 3 - Global Warming and Tradable Emission Permits 92
  • 4 - Dynamic Analysis of Global Warming 115
  • 5 - Dynamic Optimality and Sustainability 138
  • 6 - Global Warming and Forests 169
  • 7 - Global Warming as a Cooperative Game 193
  • Summary and Concluding Notes 241
  • References 261
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 279

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.