The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction

By Edward James; Farah Mendlesohn | Go to book overview
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The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors viii
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Chronology xx
  • Farah Mendlesohn - Introduction: Reading Science Fiction 1
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - The History 13
  • 1 - Science Fiction Before the Genre 15
  • 2 - The Magazine Era: 1926–1960 32
  • 3 - New Wave and Backwash: 1960–1980 48
  • Notes 62
  • 4 - Science Fiction from 1980 to the Present 64
  • 5 - Film and Television 79
  • 6 - Science Fiction and Its Editors 96
  • 2 - Critical Approaches 111
  • 7 - Marxist Theory and Science Fiction 113
  • Notes 123
  • 8 - Feminist Theory and Science Fiction 125
  • Notes 134
  • 9 - Postmodernism and Science Fiction 137
  • Notes 147
  • 10 - Science Fiction and Queer Theory 149
  • Notes 159
  • 3 - Sub-Genres and Themes 161
  • 11 - The Icons of Science Fiction 163
  • 12 - Science Fiction and the Life Sciences 174
  • 13 - Hard Science Fiction 186
  • Notes 195
  • 14 - Space Opera 197
  • Notes 207
  • 15 - Alternate History 209
  • 16 - Utopias and Anti-Utopias 219
  • Notes 228
  • 17 - Politics and Science Fiction 230
  • 18 - Gender in Science Fiction 241
  • Notes 251
  • 19 - Race and Ethnicity in Science Fiction 253
  • Notes 262
  • 20 - Religion and Science Fiction 264
  • Further Reading 276
  • Index 285
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