An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

By Richard Eldridge | Go to book overview

8
Art and emotion

Some varieties of emotional response
Consider the following cases:
1. On an April 10, 1982 installment of SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, the Not-Ready-for-Prime-Time Players threatened to boil a real lobster named “Larry the Lobster” live on the air. As Eddie Murphy informed the audience (speaking quickly): “You want to save Larry the Lobster dial 1-900-720-1808. Then (speaking slowly) “If you want to kill him dial 1-900-720-1809. Now unless you call in to save him, we're going to boil Larry's little butt right here on national television. Now you call in. The phone company is going to charge you fifty cents, but isn't it worth fifty cents to save Larry's life? Or look at it this way: Isn't it worth half a buck to see us boil Larry on TV?” Nearly 500,000 viewers dialed into the program. The final tally? KILL LARRY: 227,452; SAVE LARRY: 239,096.1
2. Hand in hand, we've met life's changes and challenges.

Side by side, we've shared our most precious dreams.

Together we've built a beautiful life. And every year,

I grow more in love with you Happy Birthday!2

____________________

-183-

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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1 - The Situation and Tasks of the Philosophy of Art 1
  • 2 - Representation, Imitation, and Resemblance 25
  • 3 - Beauty and Form 47
  • 4 - Expression 68
  • 5 - Originality and Imagination 102
  • 6 - Understanding Art 128
  • 7 - Identifying and Evaluating Art 150
  • 8 - Art and Emotion 183
  • 9 - Art and Morality 205
  • 10 - Art and Society: Some Contemporary Practices of Art 231
  • 11 - Epilogue: the Evidence of Things Not Seen 259
  • Bibliography 264
  • Index 277
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