An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

By Richard Eldridge | Go to book overview

Index
Abramovic, Marina 254
Abrams, M. H. 104, 135–38, 140–41
absorption 57–61, 63–66, 70, 83, 145, 169, 171
Acconci, Vito 25, 254
Acropolis, the 2
Addison, Joseph 48, 50, 166
Adorno, Theodor 8, 11, 111, 147, 239, 241 on originality 109–14
Aesop 217
aesthetic affirmation 240–42, 249, 257
aisthesis48
Althusser, Louis 22, 241, 243–44
Altieri, Charles 248
amusement 68, 188 Collingwood on 73
Angkor Watt 75
antagonism 7, 8, 14–16, 142, 220, 221, 229, 244, 245, 248, 253, 262, 263 Kant and Schiller on 14
antiessentialism 21–22
Aristotle 2, 18, 24, 26–29, 38, 41, 43, 48, 54, 96 on catharsis 42, 71, 88, 198–200, 215 on pity and fear 198–99 on point of view 27–28 on representation 40 on requirements for tragedy 42–43
Armstrong, Louis 79, 258
articulation, philosophy as 4–5, 23
Austen, Jane 2, 147, 194 Pride and Prejudice239, 253
Austin, J. L. 196
autonomism 207–09, 211–12, 214 extreme vs. moderate 209, 213–14
avant-gardism 239, 249, 252–53
Bacon, Sir Francis 48
Bach, J. S. 155, 195, 251
Bakhtin, Mikhail 120
Balanchine, George 70, 258
Balzac, Honoré de 241
Barrell, John 115
Barth, John 61, 252
Barthelme, Donald 253
Barthes, Roland 118, 136
Battersby, Christine 119
Baumgarten, Alexander 48–49
Baxandall, Michael 59, 144 on influence 106 on intentional understanding 134–35
Beardsley, Monroe 24, 57–60, 63, 65, 91, 143 on aesthetic/nonaesthetic 224 on art and morality 208–09 on clarification 262 on expression 91 on Levinson 17–18 on texture vs. structure 60 on the value of art 126–27 on unity, intensity, and complexity 60
beauty 23, 47–67, 84, 162–64, 181, 246 Hegel on 108 Schiller on 12–13
Becerra, Antonio 223
Beckett, Samuel 30, 61, 224, 241, 252

-277-

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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1 - The Situation and Tasks of the Philosophy of Art 1
  • 2 - Representation, Imitation, and Resemblance 25
  • 3 - Beauty and Form 47
  • 4 - Expression 68
  • 5 - Originality and Imagination 102
  • 6 - Understanding Art 128
  • 7 - Identifying and Evaluating Art 150
  • 8 - Art and Emotion 183
  • 9 - Art and Morality 205
  • 10 - Art and Society: Some Contemporary Practices of Art 231
  • 11 - Epilogue: the Evidence of Things Not Seen 259
  • Bibliography 264
  • Index 277
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