Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate

By Martin Barker; Julian Petley | Go to book overview

Media Studies in Higher Education in 1996 showed that nationally students from these courses were doing better than other sectors of the social sciences and humanities in finding course-related employment.

10
Phillips is guilty of enormous carelessness in her book. At one point, for instance, she complains that media education is harmful because it 'has an explicitly ideological purpose' (ibid.: 118). How does Phillips know this? Because David Buckingham says so. The only problem is, however, that Phillips is quoting others quoting Buckingham. Had she bothered to read Buckingham's original text she would have discovered that he is actually criticising such a conception of media studies, and that it is only one among a number of competing paradigms of the subject. This kind of mistake is symptomatic of her simple lack of knowledge and understanding. Or as John Sutherland put it in his review in the London Review of Books (3 October 96): 'the whole argument of All Must Have Prizes rests on unsubstantiated assertion. Where one has any personal acquaintance with the subject, Phillips is invariably wrong… It's a nice question as to what is most offensive about this book: the author's ignorance of her subject, the laziness of her methods, or the arrogance of her pronouncements'.

REFERENCES
Ferguson, M. and Golding, P. (1997), Cultural Studies in Question, London: Sage.
Hoggart, R. (1996), The Way We Live Now, London: Pimlico.
Phillips, M. (1998), All Must Have Prizes, Warner Books.
Philo, G. and Miller, D. (1997), Cultural Compliance, Glasgow: Glasgow University Media Group.
Scruton, R. (1984), The Meaning of Conservatism, Basingstoke: Macmillan.

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Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • References 25
  • 1 - The Newson Report 27
  • 2 - The Worrying Influence of 'Media Effects' Studies 47
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - Electronic Child Abuse? 63
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Living for Libido; Or, 'Child's Play Iv' 78
  • 5 - Just What the Doctors Ordered? 87
  • References 108
  • 6 - Once More with Feeling 111
  • References 125
  • 7 - I Was a Teenage Horror Fan 126
  • 8 - 'Looks like It Hurts' 135
  • 9 - Reservoirs of Dogma 150
  • 10 - Us and Them 170
  • References 184
  • 11 - Invasion of the Internet Abusers 186
  • 12 - On the Problems of Being a 'trendy Travesty' 202
  • References 224
  • Index 225
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