Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America

By Harumi Befu; Sylvie Guichard-Anguis | Go to book overview

8

Japanese popular music in Hong Kong

Analysis of global/local cultural relations

Masashi Ogawa

Over the past 40 years in Hong Kong, the influences of Japanese popular culture have become widespread. In particular, Japanese popular music has played a significant role in Hong Kong's popular arts scene since the 1970s. However, the nature of this role has varied over the past decades. To help readers understand the changing development of this influence, this chapter will look first at the history of Hong Kong popular music by focusing on the changing influences of Japanese pop music in the past decades. Second, it will discuss how the image of Japan itself has been working to shape the image of Japanese pop music in the 1990s music scene. Last, it will examine how the globalization process, in the sense of compression of the world, is reflected in the history of Hong Kong popular music by focusing on the relationship between Japanese and Hong Kong popular music.


Hong Kong pop music history

The roots of Hong Kong pop music

Many scholars and music critics agree that the roots or prototype of the Chinese commercial pop song (at least, that of which the composers and lyricist can be identified) is the Shanghai-style pop song known as Si Doi Kuk in Cantonese. This style of commercial music, which began to develop between the 1920s and the 1930s, flourished in the 1940s (Wong 1997:18). The songs were sung in Mandarin and were based mainly on the Chinese traditional minor key combined with some modern musical elements, such as the use of Western instruments (an influence of the "concession culture" of the time in Shanghai). The early establishment of a record industry helped the spread of the Shanghai pop song in China. Baak Doi record company (Hong Kong EMI at present) was established in Shanghai by a British merchant in the 1930s and accounted for about 90 percent of the market share of Mandarin pop song records in China from the late 1930s to the early 1940s (Wong 1997:21).

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xii
  • Tables xiii
  • Series Editor's Preface xvii
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Global Context of Japan Outside Japan 3
  • Bibliography 21
  • Part II - Human Dispersal 23
  • 2 - Objects, City, and Wandering 25
  • Part III - Organizational Transplant 41
  • 3 - Positioning "Globalization" at Overseas Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinational Corporations 43
  • 4 - Japanese Businesswomen of Yaohan Hong Kong 52
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - Neverland Lost 69
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Soka Gakkai in Germany 94
  • Part IV - Cultural Diffusion 109
  • 7 - Japanese Comics Coming to Hong Kong 111
  • Bibliography 120
  • 8 - Japanese Popular Music in Hong Kong 121
  • 9 - Global Culture in Question 131
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 148
  • Part V - Images 151
  • 10 - A Collision of Discourses 153
  • 11 - Images of the Japanese Welfare State 176
  • Bibliography 190
  • 12 - Consuming the Modern 194
  • 13 - Japan Through French Eyes 209
  • 14 - The Yamatodamashi of the Takasago Volunteers of Taiwan 222
  • Index 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.