Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America

By Harumi Befu; Sylvie Guichard-Anguis | Go to book overview

shoplifting detection difficult. This old leather suitcase was almost identical in design to the one used in Tokyo, but there were no British names, no evocation of the Raj on its label, which showed it to be of Japanese manufacture. Placed in this receptacle, do the worn images now evoke memories of Japan's colonial adventures? How can we fix the meaning of Yamamoto's piece if we cannot fix its form? How do we frame questions of globalization in ways adequate to art's shape-shifting migration from one locale to the next?


Notes
1
For instance, on 20 March 1997, New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman argued that we have entered a "new world of globalization - a world in which the integration of financial networks, information and trade is binding the globe together and shifting power from governments to markets."
2
Five years later, in 1979, Yamagishi teamed up with Cornell Capa to create another exhibition called "Japan: A Self-Portrait" for the International Center for Photography. Please note: all Japanese names are given in non-Japanese order (family name last) since this is the way that they appear in most exhibition catalogues and reviews in the United States.
3
The exhibition "Black Sun: The Eyes of Four" was organized jointly by the Alfred Stieglitz Center of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, and the Arts Council of Great Britain, and exhibited in both the United States and Great Britain. The catalog was published as a special issue of Aperture.
4
The "Against Nature" exhibition traveled to San Francisco, Akron, Boston, Seattle, Cincinnati, New York, and Houston.
5
For a discussion on the continuing importance of regionalism within Japan, contrasted with "the strongly unified national image that Japan projects abroad," see Wigen (1996).
6
For instance, an Ishimoto photograph of a southside Chicago scene was included in the "Tokyo kokuritsu kindai bijutsukan to shashin 1953-1995" (Photography and the National Museum of Art, Tokyo 1953-1995) exhibition at the Tokyo Kokuritsu Kindai Bijutsukan in 1995.
7
This phrase was on a wall label at the Toshio Shibata exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago, 1993.
8
The difficulties of nonspecialist American art curators finding fresh perspectives in the Japanese art world and the particular strength of the trope of Japan's close relation with nature is discussed in Osaka and Kline (1989).
9
This point is from a press release titled "The Museum of Modern Art Expands New Photography Series" issued by the museum in September 1992.
10
Huntington lists "Japanese" and "Confucian" separately among the world's "seven or eight major civilizations".
11
For a different form of the argument that global culture does not necessitate the end of nation-states, see Featherstone (1990).
12
For instance, both John Szarkowski and Shoji Yamagishi wrote for the 1974 catalogue New Japanese Photography, and both Anne Tucker and Etsuro Ishihara wrote for Toshio Shibata's Landscape volume.
13
The show was titled "-ism '95: The 1st Tokyo International Photo-Biennale." A catalogue by the same name was published by the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, 1995.

-147-

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Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xii
  • Tables xiii
  • Series Editor's Preface xvii
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Global Context of Japan Outside Japan 3
  • Bibliography 21
  • Part II - Human Dispersal 23
  • 2 - Objects, City, and Wandering 25
  • Part III - Organizational Transplant 41
  • 3 - Positioning "Globalization" at Overseas Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinational Corporations 43
  • 4 - Japanese Businesswomen of Yaohan Hong Kong 52
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - Neverland Lost 69
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Soka Gakkai in Germany 94
  • Part IV - Cultural Diffusion 109
  • 7 - Japanese Comics Coming to Hong Kong 111
  • Bibliography 120
  • 8 - Japanese Popular Music in Hong Kong 121
  • 9 - Global Culture in Question 131
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 148
  • Part V - Images 151
  • 10 - A Collision of Discourses 153
  • 11 - Images of the Japanese Welfare State 176
  • Bibliography 190
  • 12 - Consuming the Modern 194
  • 13 - Japan Through French Eyes 209
  • 14 - The Yamatodamashi of the Takasago Volunteers of Taiwan 222
  • Index 251
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