Faulkner in the Twenty-First Century: Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha, 2000

By Robert W. Hamblin; Ann J. Abadie | Go to book overview

and this confinement. To be at one and the same time the insane free from here and the bird of multiplicity from over there. To enter into a new emotion and an unprecedented feeling of the world collectivity, where we neither lose nor dilute ourselves, and where the frontier and the inside-outside world no longer give rise to, or maintain, an impossibility.

This is difficult. (220)

But this is also the Faulkner of the twenty-first century.


NOTES
1
I wish to thank Herbert Peck, of the Department of Fine Arts, Vanderbilt University, for help with the photographic images discussed in this essay.
2
H. L. Mencken, “The Sahara of the Bozart, ” in Prejudices: Second Series (New York: Knopf, 1924), 136–54. Charles Angoff and H. L. Mencken, “The Worst American State: Part 3, ” American Mercury 24 (November 1931): 355–71; Parts 1 and 2, September and October, 1931. Cited hereafter in the text.
3
Malcolm Cowley, ed., The Portable Faulkner (New York: Viking, 1946). Revised 1967. Quotations, cited hereafter in the text, are from the revised edition.
4
James W. Silver, Mississippi: The Closed Society (New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1964). A similar case of posthumous participation is Louis D. Rubin, Jr., “Notes on a Rear-Guard Action, ” in The Curious Death of the Novel (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967), 131–51. Silver cited hereafter in the text.
5
Eduoard Glissant, Faulkner, Mississippi, trans. Barbara B. Lewis and Thomas C. Spear (New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1999). French edition, 1996. Cited hereafter in the text.
6
Ellen Glasgow, A Certain Measure: An Interpretation of Prose Fiction (New York: Harcourt Brace and Company, 1943), 138.
7
William Faulkner in Paris, photograph by W. C. Odiorne, in Jack Cofield, William Faulkner: The Cofield Collection (Oxford, Miss.: Yoknapatawpha Press, 1979), 71.
8
Publicity photograph for The Marble Faun [1924], by Willa Johnson, in William Faulkner Collection, Special Collections Department, Manuscripts Division, University of Virginia Library.
9
For the self-caricature and several other images of Faulkner, see “William Faulkner: Man and Writer, ” Saturday Review, 28 July 1962, 11–26.
10
Cofield, Faulkner in RAF uniform, 55–56; Faulkner in hunting “pinks, ” 8–9.
11
The most widely disseminated version of this narrative is Cleanth Brooks's in William Faulkner: The Yoknapatawpha Country (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1963).
12
Joseph Blotner, Faulkner: A Biography (New York: Random House, 1974), 1:655.
13
H. L. Mencken, “Uprising in the Confederacy, ” American Mercury 16 (March 1930), 380.
14
James B. Meriwether and Michael Millgate, eds., Lion in the Garden: Interviews with William Faulkner, 1926–1962 (New York: Random House, 1968), 19.
15
Frederick R. Karl, William Faulkner: American Writer (New York: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1989), 726. See also Leigh Anne Duck's essay elsewhere in this volume for a fine discussion of the Cowley Faulkner.
16
The allusion in the phrase “the mind of the South” is of course to W. J. Cash, The Mind of the South (New York: Knopf, 1941).
17
C. Vann Woodward, “The Search for Southern Identity, ” in The Burden of Southern History (New York: Vintage, 1960), 25. Quotations cited hereafter in the text.
18
The metaphor of sickness is prevalent in discussing the racial violence in the South in the post Brown decade. See I. F. Stone, quoted in John Egerton, Speak Now Against the Day: The Generation before the Civil Rights Movement in the South (New York: Knopf,

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Faulkner in the Twenty-First Century: Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha, 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.