Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

Further reading

b
Bonnett, M., Children's Thinking, London: Cassell, 1994.

c
Cooper, D., Authenticity and Learning, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

d
Dreyfus, H. and Hall, H., Heidegger: A Critical Reader, Oxford: Blackwell, 1992.

m
Mulhall, S., Heidegger and Being and Time, London: Routledge, 1996.

p
Peters, M. (ed.), Heidegger, Modernity and Education, Boulder, CO: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001.

MICHAEL BONNETT


HERBERT EDWARD READ 1893-1968

Art should be the basis of education. 1

Herbert Read was one of the most prolific, cosmopolitan and ambitious English intellectuals and men of letters of the twentieth century. During his lifetime he was practically ubiquitous as a critic, scholar, poet, advocate and educator. He left a singular legacy of academic and popular publications-more than sixty books and 1000 articles and reviews-which include his own considerable literary achievements, and his relentless political and cultural advocacy for interpreting and understanding modern art and literature. He was a man who championed such world-class talents as Karl Jung and Henry Moore, while becoming a public antagonist of others such as T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden. While his passion for individual liberty has led Read to be widely characterized as a 'philosophical anarchist' (a description which Read would not disavow), 2 the man was personally restrained in speech and at least in public temperament. He was indeed a man of paradox and contradiction.

Herbert Read was born in Yorkshire on 4 December 1893, grew up on a farm, and attended the University of Leeds. During the First World War he served as an infantry officer, an experience which, like others of his generation, found compelling expression in poetry, such as in Read's Naked Warriors (1919). After the war Read worked for a few years at the Treasury (1919-22) and then became an assistant keeper at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (1922-31). He taught briefly at the University of Edinburgh (1931-33) and edited the Burlington Magazine (1933-39), a fixture of the British cultural establishment. Throughout the 1930s he championed such modernists as the writers Samuel Beckett and Denton Welch, and such artists as Barbara Hepworth and Ben Nicholson. The magazine editorship provided an open channel to the academic and highbrow community, but Read also proselytized for modernism in a copious series of popular books, magazine and newspaper reviews directed at the general public.

In this ambition Read carried forward the work of John Ruskin and William Morris, nineteenth-century precursors who sought to reduce the distinction between art and life by exploring aesthetic concepts as social value, such as the tradition of craftsmanship, drawn from the visual arts. These might provide remedies for repairing, what they saw as, an

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Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
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