Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

value for animating teachers and others of good will. Students today would look at Read more for historical interest than current citation, but the nobility of that vision and the aspiration for a just society built on principles of individual expression make Read's prose still worth pondering. The spirit of his ideas survive in the social and cultural orientation which draws on works of literature and art as sources for moral encouragement and instruction, and that continues as a priority in the careers of so many writers and artists, teachers, parents and others (an example in American art education would be the 'Caucus on Social Theory' within the National Art Education Association). Read represented the 'English' ideal, perhaps best expressed by those Romantic poets he admired, of a life lived with a sense of one's purpose and fulfilment in the grand scheme of things. Herbert Read knew his purpose and he carried it out with dispatch and fervour.


Notes
1
Read, Education through Art, pp.305, 308.
2
Read, The Cult of Sincerity, New York: Horizon Press, pp.76-93, 1968.
3
Read, Moon's Farm & Poems Mostly Elegiac, London: Faber & Faber, 1955.
4
James King, The Last Modern: A Life of Herbert Read, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, preface, p.xv, 1990.
5
Hilton Kramer, New York Times, 30 June 1968, section II, p.23.
6
Education through Art, pp.305, 308.
7
Malcolm Ross, 'Herbert Read: Art, Education and the Means of Redemption', in David Goodway (ed.), Herbert Read Reassessed, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, p.199, 1998.
8
Hilton Kramer, op cit.
9
Ibid.
10
Read, A Concise History of Modem Sculpture, London: Thames & Hudson, London, 1964.

See also

In Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: Plato, Ruskin


Read's major writings
Naked Warriors, London: Arts & Letters, 1919.
Collected Poems, London: Faber & Faber, London, new edn, 1953, c.1926.
Reason and Romanticism, New York: Russell & Russell, 1963, c.1926.
Art Now: An Introduction to the Theory of Modern Painting and Sculpture, New York: Harcourt, Brace & Company, 1933.
The Innocent Eye, New York: Henry Holt & Company, 1947, c.1933.
The Green Child: A Romance, London: Robin Clark, 1989, c.1935.
Surrealism, London: Faber & Faber, 1936.
Collected Essays in Literary Criticism, London: Faber & Faber, 2nd edn, 1951 c.1938.
To Hell with Culture, London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner, 1941.
Education through Art, London: Faber & Faber, new rev. edn 1958, c.1943.
The Grass Roots of Art, New York: Meridian, 1967, c.1946.
Art and Industry: The Principles of Industrial Design, London: Faber & Faber, 1947.
Education for Peace, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1949.
Contemporary British Art, Baltimore, MD: Penguin Books, rev. edn 1964, c.1951.

-32-

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Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
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