Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

from a keen sensibility and an incisive mind taking apart and then reconstructing deeper analyses of the aims and means of education. Critic, researcher, essayist, poet, Philip Jackson has helped the rest of us think harder and more deeply about education. Such talent is far too uncommon.


Notes
1
Philip Jackson, Untaught Lessons, New York: Teachers College Press, p.73, 1992.
2
Philip Jackson, Life in Classrooms, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, p.vii, 1968
3
Philip Jackson, Untaught Lessons, op cit., pp.1-2.
4
Ibid., pp.1-2.
5
Louis Smith and William Geoffrey, The Complexities of an Urban Classroom, New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1968.
6
Philip Jackson, The Practice of Teaching, New York: Teachers College Press, 1986.
7
Philip Jackson, Untaught Lessons, op cit.
8
Philip Jackson, John Dewey and the Lessons of Art, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998.

See also

In Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: Dewey


Jackson's major writings
Jackson, P., with J.W. Getzels, Creativity and Intelligence, London: Wiley, 1962.
Life in Classrooms, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968.
The Teacher and the Machine, Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, 1968.
The Practice of Teaching, New York: Teachers College Press, 1986.
Untaught Lessons, New York: Teachers College Press, 1992.
John Dewey and the Lessons of Art, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998.

ELLIOT W.EISNER


JANE ROLAND MARTIN 1929-

If there is one thing I have learned from my own research it is this: To make education rich and rewarding for every girl and boy and also as beneficial as possible for society as a whole, it is absolutely necessary to keep looking with clear and steady eyes on the girls and women in the educational landscape and on the cultural assets that have traditionally been placed in their keep. 1

Martin is an internationally renowned philosopher whose inquiry in and about education has shaken its conceptual foundations, showing them to b deeply and consequentially gendered. For she has theorized a hidden curriculum of gender embedded in the ideal of the educated person and in basic concepts of teaching, schooling and education itself, often assumed to be gender-blind. As remedies, she has proposed a new gender-sensitive

-203-

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Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
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