Sport Stars: The Cultural Politics of Sporting Celebrity

By David L. Andrews; Steven J. Jackson | Go to book overview

disappearing from the England team, he threw down an accursed challenge, to match his talent, to which no other player may adequately respond. And to the football world, he bequeaths the more seductive and unanswerable question, as to how truly great a player he might have been.


Notes
1
Nottage (1995. p. 45) suggests Gascoigne was a crowd darling, though Hamilton (1993) argues otherwise.
2
The Orange Order is a strictly Loyalist organization that celebrates the securing of Northern Ireland for British rule over the forces of Catholic nationalism. Historically, the Celtic football club originated among the Irish-Catholic community in Glasgow, and continues to carry a fan culture that relates to the nationalist side in Ireland.
3
Whannel (1994, p. 148) forwards a brief, more pleasing assessment of the Gascoigne myth. Perceptively, he argues that if England had won the semi-final against West Germany in 1990, Gascoigne's tears would have been overtaken by other images, thus reducing the scope for his mythical invention.
4
Reflecting the new commercial potential of the UK game, soon after the 1990 World Cup, the English FA joined with the top twenty English clubs to split with the old Football League. The new "Premier League" began in 1991, armed with an astronomical £304 million television deal, when less than fifteen years earlier the major television deal in English football had netted only £9.8 million (Giulianotti, 1999, p. 91).
5
A similar rationale was employed by American television stations in covering the 1996 Olympic Games. A large female audience was retained through the dramatizing of competition between athletes, and the use of short biopics on competitors that played upon emotional themes (for example, family tragedies, childhood traumas, medical problems).
6
There are some striking parallels between this form of self-destructive symbolic exchange and the romantic "hero'' role, as outlined by Featherstone (1995). Heroes rise above the social context, are often driven by a "demonic force", are willing to risk all in the name of a greater cause, and thus, in a Wagnerian sense, flirt with personal disaster.

Bibliography

a
Archetti, E. (1997) "And Give Joy to my Heart". Ideology and emotions in the Argentinian cult of Maradona". In G. Armstrong and R. Giulianotti (eds) Entering theField: New Perspectives on World Football. Oxford: Berg.
Armstrong, G. and Giulianotti, R. (eds) (1998) "From another angle: surveillance and football hooligans". In C. Norris, J. Moran and G. Armstrong (eds) Surveillance,CCTV and Social Control. Aldershot: Gower.

b
Barthes, R. (1972) Mythologies. London: Paladin.
-- (1977) Image-Music-Text. London: Collins.
-- (1982) Barthes: Selected Writings. London: Collins.
Baudrillard, J. (1983) In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities. New York: Semiotext(e).
-- (1990a) Seduction. London: Macmillan.
-- (1990b) Fatal Strategies. London: Pluto.
-- (1993) The Transparency of Evil: Essays on Extreme Phenomena. Trans. J. Benedict. London: Verso.

-136-

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Sport Stars: The Cultural Politics of Sporting Celebrity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Bibliography 17
  • 1 - Michael Jordan 20
  • Bibliography 34
  • 2 - Excursions into Otherness 36
  • Notes 48
  • Bibliography 49
  • 3 - Andre Agassi and Generation X 51
  • Bibliography 68
  • 4 - America's New Son 70
  • 5 - From "Child's Play" to "Party Crasher" 87
  • Bibliography 99
  • 6 - Postmodern Blackness and the Celebrity Sports Star 102
  • 7 - Evil Genie or Pure Genius? 124
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Punishment, Redemption and Celebration in the Popular Press 138
  • 9 - The Spectacle of a Heroic Life 151
  • 10 - Gretzky Nation 164
  • 11 - Hideo Nomo 187
  • 12 - Global Hingis 201
  • 13 - Nyandika Maiyoro and Kipchoge Keino 218
  • 14 - Imran Khan 231
  • 15 - Brian Lara 243
  • Notes 255
  • 16 - Cathy Freeman 257
  • Index 271
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