Family Therapy as an Alternative to Medication: An Appraisal of Pharmland

By Phoebe S. Prosky; David V. Keith | Go to book overview

Chapter 12

Love of a Lifetime*

Noralyn Masselink, PhD

“Things flow about so here!” she said at last in a plaintive tone, after she had spent a minute or so in vainly pursuing a large bright thing, that looked sometimes like a doll and sometimes like a work-box, and was always in the shelf next above the one she was looking at.

Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

My husband and I celebrated our fifteenth anniversary on June 9, 2002. I write this essay as a tribute to our love and to the few social workers and single psychiatrist and nurse-practitioner who somehow understood that despite our emotional and mental disarray and the number of problems that stemmed from the marriage itself, nevertheless, we were worth working with as a couple, and eventually as a family. As I begin, I'm acutely aware of the fact that though I tell our story, I am really only telling my story. Were my husband to tell our tale, conceivably because we have different last names, readers might see no connection whatsoever between his ac

*The following three chapters consist of two parts and a commentary. Noralyn Masselink and Oscar Davis are married and have three children. Noralyn and Oscar have each contributed a report about their travels in Pharmland in an effort to get help for themselves and their marriage. Along the way they encountered David Keith, a psychiatrist who is a family therapist. The therapy with Keith included eleven sessions between June and October 1995. The therapy ended abruptly in what seemed to be a failure. A chance event nearly a year later resulted in a reunion between the couple and the therapists.

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