Family Therapy as an Alternative to Medication: An Appraisal of Pharmland

By Phoebe S. Prosky; David V. Keith | Go to book overview

Introduction to Part 5

The only war that matters is the war against imagination. All other wars are subsumed.

—Diane Di Prima, from “Rant, ” in Pieces of a Song

Psychotherapy is a work of the practitioner's imagination. The imagination is what shapes and gives meaning to our experiences. Psychotherapy is a countercultural process. It is a process that is defined by whoever is looking at and thinking about it. It pays attention to enriching the human spirit—the only war that matters (Auerswald, 1995). It balances the complexities of freedom and responsibility, helps negotiate the dialectic of individuation and belonging. Psychotherapy depends upon creative emotional investment by the therapeutic practitioner. Much of what society does to “protect” “consumers” interferes with fundamental therapeutic processes. Psychotherapy, by disrupting the patient's relation to the culture, adds alertness and enriches relationships. It has an obvious relation to morality, insisting upon our taking responsibility for what we do. But it is further informed by a sense of beauty, which manifests in our own organization and relations, our own completeness and growth. Psychotherapy is a process of constant learning and innovation by practitioners, as is demonstrated in the following articles. They describe experiences and methods. ways of looking at therapy, that deepen our awareness of what therapy can do. Psychotherapy is not a scientific enterprise but has much in common with performance art—like music or theater.

We are presenting this diverse series of papers in the interest of stimulating your thinking about family psychotherapy. The processes outlined in other sections of the book emphasize that psychotherapy has been diluted by standardization of practice methods and the bureaucratization of mental health care. Psychotherapists are dumbed down by the promotion of drugs, the simplistic thinking of managed care, by what Pakman refers to as “globalization” of mental health practices. The most prevalent form of psychotherapy usually represents a pattern of guided social adaptation and

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Family Therapy as an Alternative to Medication: An Appraisal of Pharmland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.