The Politics of Revenge: Fascism and the Military in Twentieth-Century Spain

By Paul Preston | Go to book overview

Chronology

1892

4

December

Birth of Francisco Franco Bahamonde in El Ferrol.

1898

Defeat of Spain by USA. Loss of Cuba, Puerto Rico and Philippines.

1905

25

November

Cu-Cut incident. Army officers attack offices of satiricalweekly in reprisal for the publication of an anti-military joke.

1906

20

March

Army secures military jurisdiction over offences against the patria and the armed forces.

1917

Military Defence Juntas, formed to protest about lowpay and to protect the system of promotion by strict seniority, become involved with industrialists and trade unionists in a national reform movement, yet violently repress a socialist general strike.

1923

13

September

Military coup led by General Primo de Rivera.

1930

30

January

Primo de Rivera replaced by General Dámaso Berenguer.

1931

14

March

Foundation of fascist newspaper La Conquista del Estado by Ramiro Ledesma Ramos.

1931

14

April

Departure of Alfonso XIII and the foundation of the Second Republic.

1931

26

April

Foundation of Catholic authoritarian party, Acción Popular.

1931

10

October

Foundation of fascist party, Juntas de Ofensiva Nacional-Sindicalista by Onesimo Redondo and Ramiro Ledesma Ramos.

1931

15

December

Foundation of Alfonsine monarchist society and journal Acción Espanola.

1933

28

February

Acción Popular unites with other legalist rightist groups to form the Confederación Espanola de Derechas Autónomas.

1

March

Acción Espanola creates political front organization, Renovación Espanola.

29

October

José Antonio Primo de Rivera launches Falange Es-panola.

19

November

José Antonio Primo de Rivera elected parliamentary deputy for Cádiz.

-xvii-

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