Practice Issues in Sexuality and Learning Disabilities

By Ann Craft | Go to book overview

4

Sex education in the multiracial society

Carol Baxter

The world is racially and culturally diverse. This fact is widely reflected in most towns and cities in the Western world. Staff in health and welfare services are working with increasing numbers of people from racial minority communities. If professional standards are to be maintained then it is of paramount importance that services are offered from a multiracial/multicultural perspective. What this means in practice is that those providing services must have the appropriate attitudes, knowledge and skills to enable them to meet the needs of individual service users regardless of racial origin or cultural background.

In preparation for this chapter I carried out a review of all the sex education material held in an inner-city Health Authority Health Education Department. Although one in six of the population of this area is of either Afro-Caribbean or Asian background there was a distinct absence of material which addressed this in its content. In the relatively few resources where multiracial imagery was used, only Afro-Caribbean images were depicted and there was no portrayal of people of Asian backgrounds. Compton (1989) in her review of models of multicultural sex education highlights their cultural insensitivity particularly to Muslims, and suggests that therapists and health educators may well be perpetrating inappropriate approaches in discussion and treatment of sexuality with students and clients.

Service providers are not always aware of the ideologies which shape their beliefs and subsequently their responses to those they care for and support. It is becoming increasingly recognised that the prerequisite for effective sex education with people with learning disabilities is an awareness and understanding of one's own attitudes, beliefs and practices regarding sexuality and equally important, towards people with learning disabilities. The double discrimination which occurs when a person is also black has received little attention.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Practice Issues in Sexuality and Learning Disabilities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.