Family Therapy Review: Preparing for Comprehensive and Licensing Examinations

By Robert H. Coombs | Go to book overview

SUGGESTED FURTHER READING

Baumeister, R. F. & Twenge, J. M. (2003). The social self. In M. Theodore & M. J. Lemer (Eds.), Handbook of psychology: Personality and social psychology: Vol. 5 (pp. 327–352). New York: Wiley.

The authors state that it is difficult to think about the self without referring to other people. Although the very
concept of the self seems to denote individualism, the self is incomplete without acknowledging our interactions
with other people. Topics discussed in this chapter include: belongingness, social exclusion, and ostracism (theoretical
background, aggressive behavior and prosocial behavior, self-defeating behavior, cognitive impairment,
larger social trends in belongingness and negative outcomes); the self as an interpersonal actor (self-esteem and
interpersonal relationships, narcissism and interpersonal relationships, reflected appraisals, influence of others'
expectancies); self-presentation (favorability of self-presentation, cognition and self-presentation, harmful aspects
of self-presentation); interpersonal consequences of self-views (self-views alter person perception, self-evaluation
maintenance, self-monitoring, partner views of self, self-handicapping); emotions and the interpersonal self (shame
and guilt, embarrassment, social anxiety, disclosing emotion and personal information); and cultural and historical
variations in selfhood (culture and society, historical evolution of self, medieval times to the twentieth century, the
1960s to the present).

Marcia, J. E. (2002). Identity and psychosocial development in adulthood. Identity: vol 2 (pp. 7–28). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Discusses psychosocial development in adulthood from several perspectives. The author addresses stage-specific
crises in ego growth associated with different life cycle periods in terms of status measures expanding on Erikson's
polar alternative resolutions (E. H. Erikson, 1959). Using these status measures, the author discusses the developmental
linkages between these stages and examines development from one status to another within a particular
psychosocial stage. With respect to identity itself, the author also illustrates the cyclical process that might
describe identity re-formulation through the adult psychosocial stages. Finally, the author presents case studies
of a fifty-three-year-old man and thirty-seven-year-old woman, respectively, as examples of adult psychosocial
development


REFERENCES

Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C, Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Atkinson, R. C, & Shiffrin, R. M. (1968). Human memory: A proposed system and its control processes. In K. Spence & J. Spence (Eds.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation (Vol. 2). New York: Academic Press.

Baumrind, D. (1971). Current patterns of parental authority. Developmental Psychology Monographs, 4, No. 1, Part 2, 1–103.

Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base: Parent-child attachment and healthy human development. New York: Basic Books.

Erikson, E. (1963). Childhood and society (2nd ed.). New York: Norton.

Freud, S. (1954). Collected works (Standard edition). London: Hogarth.

Howe, M. L., & Courage, M. L. (1997). The emergence and development of autobiographical memory. Psychological Review, 104, 499–523.

Leichtman, M. D., & Ceci, S. J. (1995). The effect of stereotypes and suggestions on preschoolers' reports. Developmental Psychology, 311, 568–578.

Lucariello, J., & Mindolovich, C. (1995). The development of complex metarepresentational reasoning: The case of situational irony. Cognitive Development, 10, 551–576.

Lucariello, J., & Mindolovich, C. (2002). The best laid plans: Beyond scripts are counterscripts. Journal of Cognition & Development, 3 (1), 91–115.

Main, M., & Solomon, J. (1986). Discovery of an insecure-disorganized/disoriented attachment pattern. In T. B. Biazelton & M. W. Yogman (Eds.), Affective development in infancy (pp. 95–124). Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing.

Nelson, K. (1996). Language in cognitive development: Emergence of the mediated mind. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Ornstein, P. A., Shapiro, L. R., Clubb, P. A., & Follmer, A. (1997). The influence of prior knowledge on children's memory for salient medical experiences. In N. Stein, P. A. Ornstein, C. J. Brainerd & B. Tversky (Eds.), Memory for everyday and emotional events (pp. 83–112). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

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Family Therapy Review: Preparing for Comprehensive and Licensing Examinations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • References xxiv
  • Acknowledgments xxvii
  • Family Therapy Review - Preparing for Comprehensive and Licensing Examinations xxix
  • Part I - Individuals and the Family 1
  • Chapter 1 - Family Health and Dysfunction 3
  • Chapter 2 - Human Lifespan Development 21
  • References 39
  • Chapter 3 - Human Diversity 41
  • Chapter 4 - Psychopathology 67
  • Chapter 5 - Psychopharmacology 87
  • References 112
  • Part II - Therapeutic Skills and Tools 115
  • Chapter 6 - Theories of Family Therapy (Part I) 117
  • Chapter 7 - Theories of Family Therapy (Part Ii) 143
  • Chaptrr 8 - Assessment, Diagnoses, and Treatment Planning 169
  • References 189
  • Chapter 9 - Family Therapy Institute of Suffolk 191
  • References 211
  • Chapter 10 - Va Boston Healthcare System 213
  • References 229
  • Part III - Distressed Couples 233
  • Chapter 11 - University of Minnesota 235
  • References 255
  • Chapter 12 - Separation, Divorce, and Remarriage 257
  • References 274
  • Chapter 13 - Sexual Problems 277
  • References 298
  • Chapter 14 - Intimate Partner Violence 301
  • References 319
  • Part IV - Child and Adolescent Issues 323
  • Chapter 15 - Developmental Disabilities 325
  • Chapter 16 - Behavioral and Relationship Problems 349
  • References 366
  • Chapter 17 - Substance Abuse 371
  • References 390
  • Chapter 18 - Child Abuse and Neglect 393
  • References 410
  • Part V - Diminished Health and Well-Being 413
  • Chapter 19 - Care Giving and Grief 415
  • References 433
  • Chapter 20 - Alcohol and Other Drug Dependencies 435
  • References 455
  • Chapter 21 - Nonpharmacological Addictions 459
  • Chapter 22 - Depression and Anxiety 483
  • References 505
  • Chapter 23 - Hiv/Aids 509
  • References 526
  • Part VI - Professional Development 529
  • Chapter 24 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Family Therapy 531
  • References 546
  • Chapter 25 - Preparing for Licensing Examinations 549
  • Chapter 26 - Continuing Professional Development 569
  • About the Authors 589
  • Appendix: Answer Key 601
  • Author Index 619
  • Subject Index 633
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