Education between States, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative Perspectives

By Heinz-Dieter Meyer; William L. Boyd | Go to book overview

tion depends on how seriously these organizations confront the official framing of global educational needs.

The Global Campaign promises to enhance global civil society by opening a political space for the development of what Edwards, Hulme, Wallace (1999) calls “new social contracts” between citizens and authorities at various levels. Meeting this promise would seem to require both the development of significant educational alternatives, and continued efforts to push beyond a narrow view of universal mass schooling as an end in itself toward a broader realization of social entitlements and redistributive justice at a global level.


Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance provided by the National Academy of Education and Spencer Foundation, through the postdoctoral fellowship awarded to Karen Mundy, 1998–1999. A more detailed treatment of this topic will appear in the Comparative Education Review, February 2001.


References

Archer, D. (1994). The changing roles of non-governmental organizations in the field of education. International Journal of Educational Development 14(3), 223–232.

Bennell, P., & Furlong, D. (1997). Has Jomtien made any difference? Trends in donor funding for education and basic education since the late 1980s. Brighton, UK: University of Sussex Institute for Development Studies.

Black, M. (1996). Children first: The story of UNICEF, past and present. New York: Oxford University Press.

Boli, J., & Thomas, G. (Eds.). (1999). Constructing world culture, international nongovernmental organizations since 1875. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Bhatnager, B., & Williams, A. (1992). Participatory development and the World Bank. Washington, DC: World Bank.

Carnoy, M. (1995). Structural adjustment and the changing face of education. International Labour Review, 134(6), 653–673.

Castells, M. (1997). The power of identity, the information age: Economy, society and culture (Vol. 2). Oxford, UK: Blackwell.

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