In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in 20th Century America

By Alice Kessler-Harris | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1
Nolan Breedlove v. T.E. Suttles, Tax Collector 302 U.S. 277 (1937).
2
Goesaert et al. v. Cleary et al., 335 U.S. 464 (1948).
3
Gøsta Esping-Andersen, The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990), 11.
4
I am indebted to Eileen Boris for the term racialized gender. See her use of it in “'You Wouldn't Want One of 'Em Dancing with Your Wife': Racialized Bodies on the Job in WWII, ” American Quarterly 50 (March 1998), 77–108.
5
See especially the pathbreaking work of Joan Kelly, whose landmark essay “The Social Relations of the Sexes: Methodological Implications of Women's History, ” in her Women, History, and Theory (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984), 1–18, provided the inspiration for this direction. More recently, the work of Joan Wallach Scott has become a touchstone; see “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis, ” in her Gender and the Politics of History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988), 28–50; and see Bonnie Smith, The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998); Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich, Transforming Knowledge (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990).
6
Alice Kessler-Harris, A Woman's Wage: Historical Meanings and Social Consequences (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1990).
7
Carol Pateman, The Sexual Contract (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988), 41.
8
Quoted in John Andrews and W.D.P. Bliss, A History of Women in Trade Unions, vol. 10 of Report on Condition of Woman and Child Earners in the United States, Senate Doc. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.(Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1911), 48.
9
These examples can be found in Alice Kessler-Harris, Out to Work: A History of WageEarning Women in the United States (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982), 79, 83, 85.
10
Joan Wallach Scott, Only Paradoxes to Offer: French Feminists and the Rights of Man (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1996), chs. 2 and 3. The international connections are documented in Bonnie Anderson, Joyous Greetings: The First International Women's Movement, 1830–1860 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000); and see Ulla Wikander, “Some 'Kept the Flag of Feminist Demands Waving': Debates at International Congresses on Protecting Women Workers, ” in Wikander, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Jane

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In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in 20th Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - The Responsibilities of Life 19
  • Chapter 2 - Maintaining Self-Respect 64
  • Chapter 3 - Questions of Equity 117
  • Chapter 4 - A Principle of Law but Not of Justice 170
  • Chapter 5 - What Discriminates? 203
  • Chapter 6 - What's Fair? 239
  • Epilogue 290
  • Notes 297
  • Index 365
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