5

Being taken over

Every organization … is an emotional place. It is an emotional place because it is a human invention, serving human purposes and dependent on human beings to function. And human beings are emotional animals: subject to anger, fear, surprise, disgust, happiness or joy, ease and unease.

(Armstrong, 2000:1)

In two previous chapters I have discussed how emotions and politics combine to create organizational dynamics that limit or define emotional responses and perpetuate existing political relations. Also, emotions can be seen to underpin and influence strategic initiatives in organizations in ways that create distinctive political dynamics and organizing processes. I have been trying to bring to the surface various questions and answers about how organizations are emotional places - for example, how strategies are subverted by unacknowledged emotions, how individuals internalize and enact organizational dynamics, how links between individuals' behaviour and organizational structures are created and recreated and how initiatives designed for change come to represent or replicate existing anxieties or stuck relations. The journey into a better understanding of emotion in organizations is not about understanding emotions so much 'as their meaning, what they have to say about the organization as a system in context' (Armstrong, 2000:3; emphasis in original).

Emotions are linked to knowing and learning, knowing and learning are linked to politics. Emotions are therefore essential to control processes and need to be understood in terms of the social and political structures of which they are a part (Fineman and Sturdy, 1999). Organizational power structures evolve in ways that can undermine the legitimacy of emotions that are not attached to an organization's vision. They can therefore prompt the denial or reorganization of individual experience (Turnbull, 2002). In this chapter I discuss managers' experience of the takeover of Hyder in order to provide more information on the various ways in which emotion and politics impact on individuals and organization. My inquiry explicitly focused on managers' experience of an emotive issue (takeover) in order to reveal how emotions and associated rationalizations of emotions interacted to shape the experience and practice of managerial roles and relations. The emotions and experiences mobilized during the takeover

-76-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Strategic Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - An Introduction 1
  • 2 - Strategic Learning and Hrd 13
  • 3 - Power, Emotion and Organizational Learning 38
  • 4 - Emotion and Strategic Learning 58
  • 5 - Being Taken Over 76
  • 6 - The Politics of Imagined Stability 91
  • 7 - Organizing Reflection 106
  • 8 - Redefining Leadership 127
  • 9 - The Point of Intervention 146
  • References 161
  • Index 170
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.