Sports Management and Administration

By David C. Watt | Go to book overview

9

Management in practice

This chapter examines management in practice, starting with management processes and moving right through to the management of sport as a public service. In between, it considers financial management and the importance of monetary issues to sport, suggesting the particularly relevant issues and how they might be covered. It lists the massive legislation which impacts on sport and its management environment—added to enormously by, for example, the Disability Discrimination Act. The management of safety is mentioned and the Health and Safety at Work legislation and its implications are considered briefly. The management of support services and administration is elucidated, and public service issues are outlined.


Management processes

Many people within sports organizations see themselves as administrators rather than managers. This assumption fails to recognize the major changes facing sports organizations, which require management that has to be provided by the top people in the organization, whether paid or voluntary. People with ability must be found—the ability to make the most effective use of the available resources, to search for new resources, to innovate and take risks in stretching the organization in pursuit of new horizons.

Such change requires external awareness from everyone involved in the organization, beyond the very basic chalk-face operator. Effective officers must be oriented to working with people and drawing on their strengths, and be aware of the resources available outside their specific organization or limited role. Only by maximizing what is available internally and externally can progress be made in a time of seemingly constantly reducing resources.

Officers in any management role must be concerned with administering an ongoing effective service as well as being alert to the potential of collab-orative problem-solving, which will ease funding through external sources. Such challenges demand two distinct areas of ability—a systematic approach to tasks and a creativity in developing opportunities.

Successful management depends on the ability to adapt management skills and organizational structures and practices to the demands of the

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Sports Management and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Table ix
  • Case Studies x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • About the Author xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sport—what It's All About 9
  • 2 - The Sporting Context 23
  • 3 - The Voluntary Sector 47
  • 4 - Sports Development 65
  • 5 - Leadership 76
  • 6 - Working Together 82
  • 7 - People 96
  • 8 - Organizational Management 115
  • 9 - Management in Practice 139
  • 10 - Management Challenges 157
  • 11 - Marketing 166
  • 12 - Event Management 186
  • 13 - Education and Training 211
  • 14 - Personal Skills 228
  • 15 - Into the Future 240
  • Appendix: Useful Sports Contacts and Addresses 244
  • Bibliography 265
  • Index 275
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