Sports Management and Administration

By David C. Watt | Go to book overview

13

Education and training

This chapter highlights some of the main issues and agencies concerned with education and training for sports managers and administrators—both paid and voluntary. Having emphasized the importance of education and training, it considers coaching awards. The existence or, perhaps more accurately, the lack of, and need for, sport management education is identified. The role of national vocational standards and qualification is examined, as is the role of the national training organization—SPRITO. Finally, the training of volunteers in sport is discussed and the Running Sport programme is outlined.

Education and training should be designed to meet the needs of the people you are there to serve—the customers!

George Torkildsen

One of the key areas for sports management and administration in the UK, in all its guises, is education and training. Apart from very specific organized coach training, there has been, until recent years, little significant input to the training of people who wanted to work in sport as organizers and administrators. Thankfully, recent initiatives have seen a significant turnaround in this area, and the signs are that many more people working in sport, including the voluntary sector, will be trained in the skills of sports administration.

The driving force for this movement towards better administrative and management training is difficult to identify precisely, but it relates to a movement in political thinking, the incorporation of colleges of further education, and a combination of sports' circumstances and the requirement for administrative professionalism, led by the professionalism of sport itself. All of these factors are combining to produce a growth in courses and qualifications in sport, recreation and related subjects which will prove to be of significant benefit to the management and administration of sport. This has moved the profession from the days when all the managers came from the ranks of physical education teachers. A discrete new profession has developed, and a PE teacher would find it hard to break into the paid side of management and administration.

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Sports Management and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Table ix
  • Case Studies x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • About the Author xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sport—what It's All About 9
  • 2 - The Sporting Context 23
  • 3 - The Voluntary Sector 47
  • 4 - Sports Development 65
  • 5 - Leadership 76
  • 6 - Working Together 82
  • 7 - People 96
  • 8 - Organizational Management 115
  • 9 - Management in Practice 139
  • 10 - Management Challenges 157
  • 11 - Marketing 166
  • 12 - Event Management 186
  • 13 - Education and Training 211
  • 14 - Personal Skills 228
  • 15 - Into the Future 240
  • Appendix: Useful Sports Contacts and Addresses 244
  • Bibliography 265
  • Index 275
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