Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique

By Benita Parry | Go to book overview

12

Reconciliation and remembrance

During the early 1950s, at a time when only the most constrained and mutually impoverishing association existed between the structurally and socially separated communities, students at the anglophone universities of South Africa had the extraordinary opportunity of meeting across boundaries policed by law, custom and convention. For some of us these interactions provided an escape from a culture of compliance and conformity, opening new perspectives on the condition which we all differentially lived, and whose template had been set long before apartheid. More, we became aware that the beginnings, institutions and ethos of the mad South Africa into which we had been born, needed to be made public through political discourse and political activity, if a situation which we found socially outrageous, intellectually disgraceful and morally repugnant was to be contested and transcended.

They were the best of times and they were the worst of times. The government in power since 1948 was transforming an entrenched, egregiously oppressive system into the elaborately codified and punitive regime of apartheid; and resistant forces were intensifying the quest for programmes and strategies appropriate to the aggravated political situation. If dissent from within exclusively white academic circles was of a circumspect variety which condemned the architects of apartheid while withholding support from militant forms of contest, the student population contained more audacious elements. The English-speaking universities continued admitting a restricted number of African, Asian and Coloured candidates. Of these some withdrew from political participation, a small number were induced into collaboration with the regime, but many became what Gramsci named organic intellectuals - intellectuals who are oriented towards, and situate themselves on, the terrain of a people's struggles. With the war not long ended, there was a significant intake of mature white undergraduates - some from the then Rhodesia - who had commenced or resumed their studies after demobilization, and amongst them was a minority in whose altered horizons colonialism no longer appeared to be a natural part of the social landscape. And there were a few products of left-Zionist organizations whose first lessons in international socialism had paradoxically been learned within an exclusionary environment, and whose education was to be furthered by association with one or other revolutionary organization. It was these constituencies who remained immune from the blandishments of prominent fellow-students who although troubled by the intensification of repression, urged a stance of measured and cautious protest.

These then were becoming the very worst of times. A government haunted by spectres of communism, and unable to distinguish between moderate and radical

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 243

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.