Managing Change/Changing Managers

By Julian Randall | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Finding your way in

Managing change or changing managers
TOPIC HEADINGS
■ Current issues in the management of change
■ The different literatures contributing to the management of change
■ The theoretical assumptions underpinning the management of change
■ Sociological paradigms and organizational analysis
■ Historical human relations background to change interventions

INTRODUCTION

The Management of Change is a subject that is destined to be with us for many years to come, while people adjust to a world of work that is likely to be more fragmented than previous generations had come to expect. In the middle of the last century it would be fair to say that most people expected to choose a trade, profession or occupation and, if they wanted to, stay in it until retirement. Popular authors frequently refer to a period of stability after the Second World War when full employment was the objective of governments, whether in the Western world or in the more managed economies to be found elsewhere.

If we accept the findings of Expectancy Theory (Vroom, 1964), we would anticipate that most individuals looked forward to a stable experience of employment, which started with specific qualification levels and induction training and then proceeded through various promotions, accompanied by appropriate incremental pay rises. For many, the prospect of working for one employer enabled individuals to plan their lives, and to invest in a family and property with the security of feeling that they could discharge these responsibilities with a reasonable prospect of consistent success. Individuals might freely embark on change should opportunity arise elsewhere or an alternative offer be made in the same sector. One well-known popular writer in management summarizes what many might have felt then:

Thirty years ago I started work in a world-famous multinational company. By way of encouragement they produced an outline of my future career - 'This will be your life,'

-3-

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Managing Change/Changing Managers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Boxes xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Finding Your Way In 3
  • Chapter 2 - Thinking About Change 27
  • Chapter 3 - Managing Systems 53
  • References and Further Reading 76
  • Chapter 4 - Individuals and Change 79
  • Chapter 5 - Cultural Transformation 105
  • Chapter 6 - N-Step Models 133
  • Chapter 7 - Programmed Approaches to Organizational Change 157
  • Chapter 8 - Project Management 185
  • Chapter 9 - Change Agency 219
  • Chapter 10 - Conclusions 247
  • References and Further Reading 252
  • Index 253
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