Managing Change/Changing Managers

By Julian Randall | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Thinking about change

Stages, process or continuum
TOPIC HEADINGS
■ The types of change
■ Organizational Development
■ The theoretical underpinnings of change
■ Planned interventions and managed change
■ Emergent change initiatives and the Learning Organization

INTRODUCTION

At the heart of the Management of Change as a subject is a series of claims about what causes change and what are the solutions for managing it effectively. The claims of those who know what these solutions are can be simply and directly put, but are sometimes more general than they are specific about the definitions on which these claims rely.

In this first section we intend to spend a little time examining some of these claims, allowing a discussion to take us back to the assumptions often made but seldom acknowledged and rarely challenged in popular writers on the subject.

Here is a useful quotation to set our discussion in motion:

Change becomes a constant

Change is the third C. We already know that customers and competition have changed, but so, too, has the nature of change itself. Foremost, change has become both pervasive and persistent. It is normality.

Moreover, the pace of change has accelerated. With globalization of the economy, companies face a greater number of competitors, each one of which may introduce product and service innovations to the market. The rapidity of technological change also promotes innovation. Product life cycles have gone from years to months. Ford produced the Model T for an entire human generation. The life cycle of a computer product

-27-

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Managing Change/Changing Managers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Boxes xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Finding Your Way In 3
  • Chapter 2 - Thinking About Change 27
  • Chapter 3 - Managing Systems 53
  • References and Further Reading 76
  • Chapter 4 - Individuals and Change 79
  • Chapter 5 - Cultural Transformation 105
  • Chapter 6 - N-Step Models 133
  • Chapter 7 - Programmed Approaches to Organizational Change 157
  • Chapter 8 - Project Management 185
  • Chapter 9 - Change Agency 219
  • Chapter 10 - Conclusions 247
  • References and Further Reading 252
  • Index 253
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