The Battle over Spanish between 1800 and 2000: Language Ideologies and Hispanic Intellectuals

By José Del Valle; Luis Gabriel-Stheeman | Go to book overview

Biographical notes

Andrés Bello (Venezuela, 1781-Chile, 1865) was the foremost Latin American humanist of the nineteenth century. During the decades he spent in London (1810-1829), Bello investigated literary, cultural and scientific topics and published a number of poetic works and short studies in the journals which he founded (Repertorio americano, Biblioteca americana). Bello's most active period was in Chile (1829-1865), where he founded the University of Chile (1843), serving as its President until his death, and wrote Chile's Civil Code (1856), a Cosmography (1848), and numerous studies on Roman and International Law, science, literary criticism, philosophy and education. His Semantic Analysis of the Spanish Tenses (1841) and Spanish Grammar (1847) place him among the most astute and influential language scholars in the history of Hispanic letters.

Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (b. Argentina, 1811; d. Asuncion, Paraguay, 1888). He studied educational systems in North America and Europe, contributed to the creation of a pedagogical literature in Latin America, and established schools in Argentina and Chile. In 1842 he was named Rector of the newly-founded Escuela Normal in Santiago. In politics, he was an influential figure and one of the major ideologues of Argentina's transition from a Spanish colony to a modern independent state. He was President of Argentina from 1868 to 1874.

Juan Valera (Spain, 1824-1905). Born and raised in Andalucia, don Juan moved to Madrid as a young adult and pursued a political career, becoming a member of parliament for the Liberal Party. He held important posts in the diplomatic corps, including an ambassadorship to the United States. Valera distinguished himself among his contemporaries as a writer (his best-known novel being Pepita Jiménez), but mostly as a true man of letters, an impressive intellectual, and a sharp literary critic. He was a member of the Spanish Royal Academy (one of its most progressive members). He took great interest in "Spanish-American" literature and was instrumental in introducing Ruben Dario's poetry in Spain. Refined diplomat, casual polititian, idealist writer, and enthusiastic polemicist, the Andalucian's oeuvre-which included literary, journalistic and epistolary

-ix-

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The Battle over Spanish between 1800 and 2000: Language Ideologies and Hispanic Intellectuals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Biographical Notes ix
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • 1 - Nationalism, Hispanismo, and Monoglossic Culture 1
  • 2 - Linguistic Anti-Academicism and Hispanic Community 14
  • 3 - The Ideological Construction of an Empirical Base 42
  • 4 - Historical Linguistics and Cultural History 64
  • 5 - Menéndez Pidal, National Regeneration and the Linguistic Utopia 78
  • 6 - "For Their Own Good" 106
  • 7 - A Nobleman Grabs the Broom 134
  • 8 - José María Arguedas 167
  • 9 - "Codo Con Codo" 193
  • References 217
  • Index 231
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