The Battle over Spanish between 1800 and 2000: Language Ideologies and Hispanic Intellectuals

By José Del Valle; Luis Gabriel-Stheeman | Go to book overview

8

José María Arguedas

Peruvian Spanish as subversive assimilation

John C. Landreau

Estamos asistiendo aquí a la agonía del castellano como espíritu y como idioma puro e intocado. Lo observo y lo siento todos los días en mi clase de castellano del colegio Mateo Pumaccahua, de Canchis. Mis alumnos mestizos, en cuya alma lo indio es dominio, fuerzan el castellano, y en la morfología íntima de ese castellano que hablan y escriben, en su sintaxis destrozada, reconozco el genio del kechwa. 1

(Arguedas 1939a:33)


Introduction

Intellectual and political debates about Spanish-both in Spain and in its former colonies-have played an interesting and important role in the creation, representation and dissemination of collective identities, both national and transnational. As the previous chapters have shown, during the nineteenth century, after the constitution of the new Spanish American nations, significant discussion ocurred on both sides of the Atlantic over the question of whether Spanish would (or could or should) remain unified, or whether it might undergo a process of change and fragmentation analogous to the development of the vernacular Romance languages after the fall of the Roman Empire. Much of this debate was underwritten by concepts and vocabulary that emerged from the newly-formed science of linguistics. 2 By the early to mid-twentieth century, however, the fear that Spanish would become fragmented in America had largely subsided. 3 This was due in no small measure to the development of an international web of regulatory linguistic institutions such as state educational systems, grammars, textbooks, and the activist role of the Spanish Royal Academy. In any event, it is the case that most twentieth-century intellectuals share the assumption that a more or less unified Spanish language is (and will be) the common tongue of the nations of Spanish America. While there are disagreements about the specific contours of what constitutes "standard" Spanish, nonetheless it is clear that regional or national variations no longer occasion a serious threat to its unity. In fact, since dialectal differences are constructed against a

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Battle over Spanish between 1800 and 2000: Language Ideologies and Hispanic Intellectuals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Biographical Notes ix
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • 1 - Nationalism, Hispanismo, and Monoglossic Culture 1
  • 2 - Linguistic Anti-Academicism and Hispanic Community 14
  • 3 - The Ideological Construction of an Empirical Base 42
  • 4 - Historical Linguistics and Cultural History 64
  • 5 - Menéndez Pidal, National Regeneration and the Linguistic Utopia 78
  • 6 - "For Their Own Good" 106
  • 7 - A Nobleman Grabs the Broom 134
  • 8 - José María Arguedas 167
  • 9 - "Codo Con Codo" 193
  • References 217
  • Index 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.