Power & Conflict between Doctors and Nurses: Breaking through the Inner Circle in Clinical Care

By Maureen A. Coombs | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Collaboration

Working partnerships or sleeping with the enemy?

The previous chapter has explored the contextual issues that have influenced medical and nursing roles. This chapter has, as its focus, how doctors and nurses work together in the clinical environment. Review of the literature demonstrates that much has been written on the nature of working relationships between doctors and nurses. In this section, I will critically review the concepts that most frequently arise in literature relating to doctor-nurse relationships. The terms used to describe clinical team functioning are explored, together with the specific concept of collaboration. As the review will demonstrate, over time there have been subtle changes in the definitions used to describe team working. I suggest that these reflect the historical socialisation and contemporary dynamics of health care teams. Such definitions and developments, therefore, need to be understood cognisant of the health care context at that time.

In the latter half of this chapter, I explore the nursing and sociological literature to examine interdisciplinary working in order to understand the working relationships between doctors and nurses. This review will demonstrate how sociological perspectives can provide alternative readings on everyday clinical events, such as the ward round and the nursing handover. The chapter concludes with consideration of whether collaborative working partnerships are of interest to all within the health care team.


Collaboration in health care: definitions and concepts

Many frameworks and concepts have been used to describe the working relationships between medicine and nursing. At present, the most frequently cited concept in health care policy and literature is that of 'collaboration', meaning 'to labour together': although alternative definitions are offered that imply a willingness to co-operate with one's enemy (Webster 1990).

Collaboration is defined as being non-hierarchical in nature and a 'co-operative venture based on shared power and authority. It assumes power based on a knowledge base or expertise as opposed to power shared on role or function'

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Power & Conflict between Doctors and Nurses: Breaking through the Inner Circle in Clinical Care
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations and Glossary xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Chapter 1 - Nursing Role Developments 1
  • Chapter 2 - Collaboration 11
  • Chapter 3 - Clinical Management Teams 25
  • Chapter 4 - The Study 37
  • Chapter 5 - Understanding the Context 52
  • Chapter 6 - Clinical Decision Making and the Hierarchies of Knowledge 63
  • Chapter 7 - Roles in Clinical Decision Making 84
  • Chapter 8 - Power and Conflict on the Clinical Decision-Making Stage 97
  • Chapter 9 - Breaking Through the Inner Circle 118
  • References 127
  • Index 144
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 149

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.