Wars on Terrorism and Iraq: Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas G. Weiss; Margaret E. Crahan et al. | Go to book overview

Notes
1
During the period 2000-2, the author served as Chief of Staff to the U.N. Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process. However, the views expressed in this paper are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect U.N. attitudes or policy.
2
John Van Oudenaren, "What is 'Multilateral'?" Policy Review no. 117 (February- March 2003), pp. 33-47 at p. 33.
3
Stewart Patrick, "Beyond Coalitions of the Willing: Assessing U.S. Multilateralism, " Ethics and International Affairs 17, no. 1 (2003), pp. 37-54 at p. 37; and Stewart Patrick and Shepard Forman, eds., Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2002), pp. 27-44. See also David M. Malone and Yuen Foong Khong, Unilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: International Perspectives (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2003).
4
Patrick, "Beyond Coalitions, " p. 38.
5
Ibid., p. 40.
6
A comprehensive history is found in William B. Quandt, Peace Process: U.S. Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict since 1967, revised edition (Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 2001).
7
Author's notes, Gaza/Jerusalem, November 2000.
8
Interview with Norwegian officials; author's notes, Gaza/Jerusalem November 2000.
9
On Kissinger's thinking about the U.S.-Israeli relationship and its role in U.S.-Arab relations, see Quandt, Peace Process, pp. 183-8.
10
For a recent critique of the Taba talks and their success or failure, see David Makovsky, "Taba Mythchief, " The National Interest, no. 71 (Spring 2003), pp. 119-29.
11
See Hussein Agha and Rob Malley, "Camp David: The Tragedy of Errors, " New York Review of Books, August 9, 2001, pp. 59-65. Also see Benny Morris interview with Ehud Barak, New York Review of Books, June 13, 2002, http://www.nybooks.com/articles/15501; and Agha and Malley's response, New York Review of Books, June 13, 2002, http://www.nybooks.com/articles/14380.
12
For a contrasting view, see Makovsky, "Taba Mythchief, " pp. 119-29.
13
Author's notes, Gaza/Tel Aviv/Ramallah/Jerusalem, October-November 2001.
14
Author's notes, Tel Aviv, October 2001.
15
Statements by the Quartet from these meetings are available at http://www.state.gov/p/nea.
16
For a recent article expressing strong concern about the Quartet's role and its Road Map, see Mort Zuckerman, "A Road Map to Nowhere, " U.S. News and World Report, March 17, 2003, pp. 55-6.
17
http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2001/11/20011110-3.html.
18
http://ods-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N02/283/59/PDF/N0228359.pdf.
19
For an account of U.N.-Israel relations prior to the 1990s, see Brian Urquhart, "The United Nations in the Middle East: A 50-Year Retrospective, " Middle East Journal 49, no. 4 (Autumn 1995), pp. 572-81.
20
Author notes, U.S. Army/Lexington Institute conference on U.S. National Security Objectives for the Twenty-First Century, Washington, D.C., November 2002.
21
Some U.N. officials are in fact concerned about the implications of France's "inside/outside" role vis-à-vis U.N. peacekeeping, whereby French troops have with increasing frequency been deployed to African contexts (most recently Côte d'Ivoire) in ways that reinforce U.N. objectives, but outside the framework of U.N. authorization. Correspondence, U.N. officials, June 2003.
22
This section is based in part on author interviews with Israeli security analysts, all of them current or former senior officials of the Israeli Defense Forces.
23
Author interview, former Israeli officials of the Prime Minister's office and the IDF planning services, New York and Washington, D.C., November 2002.

-227-

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Wars on Terrorism and Iraq: Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xix
  • Abbreviations xxii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Serendipity of War, Human Rights, and Sovereignty 3
  • Part 1 - Framing the Debate 27
  • 1 - The Interplay of Domestic Politics, Human Rights, and U.S. Foreign Policy 29
  • 2 - Pre-Emption and Exceptionalism in U.S. Foreign Policy 61
  • Notes 72
  • Part 2 - Human Rights and the War on Terrorism 75
  • 3 - U.S. Foreign Policy and Human Rights in an Era of Insecurity 77
  • 4 - International Human Rights 98
  • 5 - The Fight Against Terrorism 113
  • Part 3 - U.S. Unilateralism in the Wake of Iraq 133
  • 6 - Bush, Iraq, and the U.N. 135
  • 7 - The War Against Iraq 155
  • 8 - The Future of U.S.-European Relations 174
  • 9 - Legal Unilateralism 188
  • 10 - Tactical Multilateralism 209
  • Notes 227
  • Conclusion 229
  • Whither Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy? 231
  • Notes 240
  • Index 242
  • Routledge Essential Reading 248
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