Qualitative Research in Tourism: Ontologies, Epistemologies and Methodologies

By Jenny Phillimore; Lisa Goodson | Go to book overview

13

Let your data do the talking

Researching the solo travel experiences of British and American women
Fiona Jordan and Heather Gibson
Aims of the chapter
• To critically analyse the value of in-depth interviewing and grounded theory analysis in generating qualitative data on the experiences of tourists in general and marginalised groups in particular.
• To discuss our own experiences of working collaboratively to research issues in tourism.
• To evaluate the challenges of researching the experiences of tourists who are sometimes marginalised from 'mainstream' tourism research.

Introduction

Over the past five years we have interviewed more than 50 British and American women who take solo holidays. The idea for the project was originally conceived following Fiona's LSA (UK Leisure Studies Association) 1997 presentation of a study in which she investigated the lack of provision among British travel companies for women wishing to take a solo holiday (Jordan 1998). Heather had just finished interviewing both men and women in their retirement years about their travel experiences (Gibson 2002) and was intrigued by one particular traveller's tale, that of a female artist who spoke of both the joys and the tribulations of travelling solo. We decided that it would be interesting to compare the experiences of solo women travellers from both the United Kingdom and the United States, and embarked on a research project that has evolved through various phases both methodologically and theoretically. It is the story of this study that is told in this chapter. While our study specifically explores the experiences of women travelling solo, we would suggest that a number of the issues of research design, data collection, analysis and presentation of findings discussed here have wider relevance for tourism researchers. In particular, people investigating the experiences of tourists whose voices have often been marginalised in larger-scale quantitative studies may be interested in our reflective

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Qualitative Research in Tourism: Ontologies, Epistemologies and Methodologies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.