Digital Currents: Art in the Electronic Age

By Margot Lovejoy | Go to book overview

Glossary
Algorithm A standardized mathematical procedure for obtaining a desired result. Rules taught at school in arithmetic, for example, long division, are a simple example of an algorithm.
Analog and digital There are, broadly speaking, two ways of encoding information. Analog encoding has a varying frequency and amplitude, whereas in digital encoding the signal is composed of a stream of binary units (on and off, one and zero), referred to as bits. See bits and bytes. In the past, media used by artists were entirely analog, e.g., still and movie film cameras, audio and video magnetic tape. The Internet did not yet exist. Most of these media are now being replaced by digital devices-digital video and still cameras, music CDs, CD-ROMs, and DVDs. Access to the Internet is completely digital. Still cameras with a thumbnail-size silicon chip (Charge-Coupled Device, CCD) as sensor (or three CCDs, corresponding to the three primary colors, in professional level cameras) are now rivaling film cameras in image quality. The television industry is converting, and mobile phones (but not yet wired phones) are digital. One of the last holdouts, the movie industry, now seems set for conversion. A complete three-hour movie can be recorded on one DVD. Copies can then be made and mailed out to exhibitors, who can then show them on digital video projectors with substantial cost savings once the initial changeover costs have been met.
AvatarIn Hindu mythology the gods could each appear in different forms, or avatars. Similarly in computer games and "chat rooms" a participant can protect his or her identity by assuming a different form or personality. This is taken furthest in animated moving pictures where complete actors are created from scratch using 3-D modeling software (for example, Shrek in the movie of the same name). There is now available a new MPEG-4 (see streaming video and data compression) animation standard, which defines sixty-eight facial and body animation features that can be moved to simulate normal facial gestures including speaking. The data streams can be made small enough that automated

-316-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Digital Currents: Art in the Electronic Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Sources 11
  • 1 - Vision, Representation, and Invention 13
  • 2 - The Machine Age and Modernism 36
  • 3 - The Electronic Era and Postmodernism 62
  • Part Two - Media 91
  • 4 - Video as Time, Space, Motion 93
  • 5 - Art in the Age of Digital Simulation 152
  • 6 - Art as Interactive Communications: Networking Global Culture 220
  • 7 - Transaesthetics 270
  • Glossary 316
  • Select Bibliography 323
  • Index 333
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.