Family Therapy beyond Postmodernism: Practice Challenges Theory

By Carmel Flaskas | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 of this book are edited versions of previously published articles. Chapter 5 'Truth as a process' appeared as 'Reclaiming the idea of truth: Some thoughts on theory in response to practice' in the Journal of Family Therapy (1997) 19, 1-20. Chapter 6 'The narrative self and the limits of language' appeared as 'Limits and possibilities of the narrative self' in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy (1999) 20, 20-7. One of the case studies-'First Piece'-used in Chapter 9 was originally discussed as part of an article entitled 'Engagement and the therapeutic relationship in systemic therapy' which appeared in the Journal of Family Therapy (1997) 19, 263-82. The copyright for the Journal of Family Therapy is held by the Association for Family Therapy and Systemic Practice; the copyright for the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy is held by the journal itself. I am grateful for permission to include this material.

In thinking about the process of developing this book, I would like to thank first my family therapy colleagues over the years, for all the work talk and hallway chats, the conference discussions, the sharing of work that has gone well and that has not gone well, and for their passion and humour about family therapy and the project of knowledge for family therapy. I am of course including in this group people I have supervised and taught. However, because practice always holds the greatest challenge, I would also like specifically to acknowledge the people I have worked with in therapy.

Could I also thank friends and colleagues who work psychoanalytically, though not necessarily in family therapy, and who in many ways have become a second reference group for me despite

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Family Therapy beyond Postmodernism: Practice Challenges Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.