Family Therapy beyond Postmodernism: Practice Challenges Theory

By Carmel Flaskas | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

The shape of postmodernism

As I am about to embark on a tiered exploration of postmodernism and its appearance in systemic therapy, let me begin in this chapter with a baseline discussion. Mapping postmodernism is complicated, for one can engage with it on many levels. Is postmodernism a social condition, a framework for theorising, an epistemology or a form of politics? From different angles it may be claimed to be all these things, and in this chapter I am interested in tracing the outline of postmodernism via these different layers, and then considering the specific issue of the postmodern subject and therapeutic commitment. The cohering identification which becomes apparent through this exploration is the extent to which postmodernism may be thought of as an oppositional domain. This commentary then lays the groundwork for a consideration of the particular ways in which family therapy has engaged with the postmodern.


Postmodernism as a social condition

Postmodernism is a complex phenomenon, situated in the Western cultural and intellectual environment of the late twentieth century and having many different layers of meanings and uses. Yet in its translation within family therapy, understandings of postmodernism have tended to become homogenised. There are no doubt a number of reasons for this, not least being the process of translation that occurs when a practice discipline responds to and takes in broader intellectual ideas. Whatever the reasons, though, it is fair to say that the assumption that we all knew what we were talking about when we said 'postmodernist' came to be made very quickly in family therapy and on the basis of remarkably little initial excavation of its different layers and broader contexts.

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Family Therapy beyond Postmodernism: Practice Challenges Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.