Historic U.S. Court Cases: An Encyclopedia - Vol. 2

By John W. Johnson | Go to book overview

Contents
Preface to Second Edition vii
Acknowledgments xii
VOLUME I
PART ICRIME AND CRIMINAL LAW1
Pre-1900
David Thomas Konig/Witchcraft and the Law
Salem Witchcraft Trials (1692)
7
Bonnie S. Ledbetter/Pirates Walk the Plank in Charleston
The King v. Bonnet (1718)
16
Bonnie S. Ledbetter/New York on Fire
The King v. Hughson (1741) 18
David Thomas Konig/The Writs of Assistance Cases
Petition of Lechmere (1761)
22
Harold B. Wohl/The Boston Massacre Trials
Rex v. Preston (1770),
Rex v. Weems (1770), and
Rex v. Manwaring (1770) 27
Mary K. Bonsteel Tachau/Treason and the Whiskey "Insurrection"
U.S. v. Mitchell (1795) and U.S. v. Vigol (1795)
34
Yasuhide Kawashima/Defective Indictment
The State v. Owen (1810)
37
Marie E. Windell/A Double Standard of Justice: Is Adultery by a Wife Worse Than Murder by Her Husband?
Cortes v. de Russy (1843) 39
Gordon Morris Bakken/Death for Grand Larceny
People v. Tanner (1852) 46
Thomas D. Morris/The Constitution: A Law for Rulers in War and Peace?
Ex parte Vallandigham (1864), and
Ex parte Milligan (1866) 48
Elisabeth A. Cawthon/Public Opinion, Expert Testimony, and "The Insanity Dodge"
U.S. v. Guiteau (1882) 53
1900-1959
William Lasser/The Fruits of the Poisonous Tree
Weeks v. U.S. (1914) 59
Wayne K. Hobson/Two Nations: The Case of Sacco and Vanzetti
Commonwealth v. Sacco and Vanzetti (1926)
62
Philippa Strum/Are Bootleggers Entitled to Privacy?
Olmstead v. U.S. (1928) 69
Roger D. Hardaway/Showdown Over Gun Control
U.S. v. Miller (1939)
74
John W. Johnson/Icons of the Cold War: The Hiss-Chambers Case
U.S. v. Alger Hiss (1950)
77
Joseph Glidewell/A Crime Worse Than Murder
U.S. v. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg (1951) 83
1960-2000
Stephen Lowe/The Exclusionary Rule Binds the States
Mapp v. Ohio (1961) 91
Tinsley E. Yarbrough/"Good Faith" and the Exclusionary Rule
U.S. v. Leon (1984) 94
Tinsley E. Yarbrough/"Incorporation" and the Right to Counsel
Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) 99
Delane Ramsey/Lawyer? You Want a Lawyer?
Escobedo v. Illinois (1964) 104
B. Keith Crew/"You Have the Right to Remain Silent"
Miranda v. Arizona (1966),
Vigner v. New York (1966),
Westover v. U.S. (1966), and
California v. Stewart (1966) 108
B. Keith Crew/The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment
Furman v. Georgia (1972) and
Gregg v. Georgia (1976) 114

-v-

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