Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

J

Jabril, Ahmed

b. 1938

Jabril was the leader for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine General Command, one of the more extreme Palestinian terrorist groups which provided support for the most rejectionist that is, the most vehemently opposed to the Israeli-Palestine peace process and dialogue. Jabril's base was mainly in Syria.

In 1988 a year after the introduction of the intifada Israel mounted a massive raid on Jabril's headquarters outside Beirut, to show it was not intimidated by the intifada.

There was much rivalry between Jabril and Yasser Arafat as Jabril was supported by Syria which was determined to control all the groups in the Lebanon including Arafat's. He carried on the war with Israel by using suicide bombers; as he was very bitter and hateful toward Arafat after he had formerly recognised Israel's right to exist and renounced terrorism in December 1988.

See also: Arafat.


Japan

Since the debacle of defeat in 1945, Japan has emerged, thanks to American help, as one of the most economically strong and democratic nations in Asia. Although the Liberal Democratic Party has held power for the past three decades, there has been much opposition, and acts of politically motivated violence have been carried out by both extreme right- and left-wing groups. Although there are many right-wing organisations, membership of each of them is small, and generally they advocate totalitarian government as the best solution to overcome corruption, exploitation and unequal treaties with foreign powers. Extreme left-wing groups have extended operations to targets outside Japan, particularly in terms of hijacking to which until the late 1970s the Japanese government meekly acceded. Since then tougher approaches have been adopted to hijacking. Left-wing groups take part in violent clashes and ideological feuds with each other on regular occasions.

The most well-known of the radical groups is the United Red Army (Rengo Shekigun), although in recent years its activities have decreased. This terrorist group was established among disillusioned students who saw in the Paris student riots in May 1968 their blueprint for bringing about world revolution. The group has been noted for its violent clashes, the extremism of the original female leader, Fusako Shigenobu, and the number of radical leftists who have been killed in internal clashes.

In spite of these problems, and the success of the security forces against them, the United Red Army has declared that it will continue to fight for the materialisation of a people's republic of Japan by uniting and joining forces with the oppressed people, comrades and friends in confrontation with Japanese imperialism. During early operations it stressed the need to fight against Zionism, and later affirmed the need for a revolution in Japan and its solidarity with the Japanese people in their struggle against the monarchy, and criticised Japan's economic exploitation of South Korea. Its

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.