Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

K

Kashmir

Over the past half century tense Hindu-Muslim relations in India, including riots in cities like Mumbai and Kolhhata has posed new strains on India-Pakistan relations. The unabated conflict in the disputed territory of Kashmir remains a major threat to regional peace and security. With its Muslim majority, Kashmir rejects Indian authority.

In 1988 the old dispute was revived. Militant Muslim groups wanting secession of Kashmir to Pakistan resorted to 'violence', using weapons bought in from Pakistan and Afghanistan. There are six major groups of Kashmiri secessionists claiming 45,000 guerrillas in all - some wanting independence some wanting union with Pakistan, some were Islamic fundamentalists and others wanted a democratic state (Brogan, 1992).

The most dangerous are the Jamma and Kashmir Liberation Front, led by Javad Ahmad Mir, which supports independence for Kashmir including that part of the ancient province now occupied by Pakistan and known as Azad Kashmir (Free Kashmir).

Growing ethno-nationalism is fuelling the conflict. The separate Kashmir identity is substantiated on the basis of geographic, linguistic, historical and religious differences. Over 35,000 Kashmiri's have lost their lives in armed encounters since 1989. Any possible solution - a United Nations supervised plebiscite, complete independence, regionally guaranteed autonomy or further partition will upset either India or Pakistan and lead to further bouts of terrorism and violence (Malik, 1993).


References
Brogan, P. (1992) World Conflicts: Why and Where They are Happening, London: Bloomsbury.
Malik, I. H. (1993) 'The Continuing Conflict in Kashmir: Regional Détente in Jeopardy', Conflict Studies, no. 259, London: RISCT.

Khmer Rouge

The Khmer (Cambodian) Liberation Army - dubbed the 'Khmer Rouge' by Cambodian head of state Prince Norodom Sihanouk in the late-1960s, was a peasant-based revolutionary force which established its political authority over all Cambodia in April 1975. Three years later there was a Vietnamese invasion of Kampuchea in December 1978 and a war that flickered on until the mid-1980s.

The split between Vietnamese and Cambodian revolutionaries dates back to 1954, when the new government in Hanoi, North Vietnam, anxious to adhere to the terms of the Geneva Agreements withdrew support from the Cambodian Communist Party and left the state to pursue a neutralist policy under the autocratic Sihanouk. He achieved widespread popularity and the relative prosperity of Cambodia grew. Communists in Cambodia, convinced that the North Vietnamese government in Hanoi had betrayed the revolution, went underground. However, they could achieve little on their own apart from setting up safe base areas on the Maoist pattern and organising occasional guerrilla attacks.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.