Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

L

Language of Terrorists

The statements of terrorists characterise their philosophies and ideologies, which are a frontal attack on liberal values and principles. Terrorism is an instrument or political weapon developed by revolutionaries, and they believe that because states commit acts of terror and violence, it is permissible for terrorists to do the same.

Armed struggle (German terror groups) - a legally justified campaign against the power of the state.

Armed struggle (Marighella) - includes civilian elements and can develop into a peasant struggle.

Gorillas (Marighella) - the military in Latin America, in the opinion of guerrillas such as Marighella.

Guerrilheiros (Marighella) - the revolutionaries.

Guerrilla warfare (Marighella) - a technique of mass resistance - a type of complementary struggle, which will not by itself bring final victory. In ordinary warfare and in revolutionary struggle, guerrilla warfare is a supplementary form of combat.

Latifundio (Marighella) - large estate worked by peasants and generally under-exploited.

Mass front (Marighella) - a combat front, an action front going as far as armed action.

Military struggle (Marighella) - conflict within the armed forces which must be combined with working-class and peasant struggle in line with the tactics and strategy of the proletariat.

Outlaw (Marighella) - concerned with his personal advantage and indiscriminately attacks exploiters and exploited.

Resistance (Mao) - is characterised by the quality of spontaneity; it begins of its own accord and then is organised.

Revolutionary army (Guevara) - an army which is welded to the people - the peasants and workers from whom it sprang. An army which is conversant with strategy and ideologically secure. It is invincible.

Revolutionary guerrilla movement (Mao) - is organised and then begins.

Terrorism (Marighella) - a form of mass action without factionalism and without dishonour, which ennobles the spirit.

Urban guerrilla (Marighella) - an armed man who uses other than conventional means for fighting against the military dictatorship, capitalists and imperialists.

Yin-yang (Mao) - a unity of opposites in Maoist theory. Concealed within strength there is weakness and within weakness, strength. It is a weakness of guerrillas that they operate in small groups that can be wiped out in a matter of minutes. But because they do operate in small groups they can move rapidly and secretly into the vulnerable rear of the enemy.

Every terrorist group in a liberal democratic society tries to make maximum use of the freedom of speech and of the media that prevails. Only when terrorists have a solid constituency of public support can they hope to become a more effective political force.

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Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
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