Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

U

Unabomber

The Unabomber, Theodore Kaczynski, targeted persons associated with either universities or the airline industry in the USA. He killed three and wounded 23 others using home-made bombs sent through the post. His offer to stop his campaign if his 'manifesto' was published, led to a 35,000 word article in the Washington Post attacking technology, modernity and the destruction of the environment. He was a man obsessed with publicity, a mathematics lecturer from the University of California in Berkeley. He could be described as a frustrated loner, working from a Montana log cabin. His activities showed terrorism had become accessible to anyone with a grievance (Hoffman, 1998).

He was clumsy in his attacks, as often the wrong people were killed or injured. The point is that he believed in his own bitter frustrated way that revolution was easier than reform, because the system grew the more disastrous the consequences and more and more millions of people would be deprived of dignity and authority.

The Unabomber case showed that individuals in contrast to groups were exceedingly difficult to detect. A similar case occurred in Australia with a letter bomber, Franz Fuchs. The frightening aspect of the Unabomber case is that he had scientific knowledge and what might have happened if weapons of mass destruction had been at his disposal. The bizarre, almost eccentric aspect of the event is that he really believed that sending out letter bombs would bring about the end of industrial civilisation. To many global observers he could be seen as a paranoid schizophrenic or one who was psychologically disturbed (Laqueur, 2001).

See also: Suicide Terrorism.


References
Hoffman, B. (1998) Inside Terrorism, London: Victor Gollancz.
Laqueur, W. (2001) The New Terrorism: Fanaticism and the Arms of Mass Destruction, London: Phoenix Press.

United Kingdom

England

Until the end of the Second World War, from the British perspective, violent insurrection and guerrilla warfare were phenomena experienced by foreigners. All has now changed. Britain has had a vital concern in curbing the spillover of international terrorism from the Middle East and Europe and the internecine strife between groups in the Asian subcontinent into London's international diplomatic and business community. The terrorist campaign in Ireland has been a cancer in the British body politic for over a decade, and Britain also has to help safeguard British persons, property and interests overseas. The fight against terrorism has not been without difficulty from a legal point of view, for instance in comparison between a civil law state like France and a common law state like the United Kingdom. In the UK, where extradition is a judicial procedure, the courts have not in practice

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Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
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