Affirmative Action in the United States and India: A Comparative Perspective

By Thomas E. Weisskopf | Go to book overview

15

Review of the findings on the consequences of positive discrimination policies in university admissions

In the preceding six chapters I have reviewed much of the evidence available in the US and India that has a bearing on the consequences of positive discrimination (PD) policies in admissions to higher educational institutions. In this chapter I summarize this evidence, organizing it so as to shed light on the extent to which the various claims of PD benefits and costs have actually been validated in the experience of the US and India with PD policies. Then I draw on the summarized evidence, as well as a priori reasoning, to draw conclusions about the consequences of PD policies in admissions to higher educational institutions.


Summary of the evidence

I begin with estimates of the overall number and the average academic qualifications of PD beneficiaries in each country. Then I go on to summarize the evidence that has a bearing on each of the claims of benefits and costs made by proponents and critics of PD policies in higher educational admissions, starting with claims for which the evidence is relatively abundant and then moving on to claims for which evidence is increasingly difficult to obtain. 1 At the end of each relevant paragraph-or section thereof-in which evidence is summarized, I note (in parentheses) in which chapters and pages of this book a detailed discussion of the evidence can be found.


Estimates of the total number of PD beneficiaries

In the US, the most important effect of affirmative action (AA) policies in university admissions at the undergraduate/college level is to redistribute under-represented ethnic group (UREG) students upward and non-UREG students downward across the selectivity spectrum of universities, thereby increasing UREG enrollments in the more selective and higher-quality colleges. At the graduate and professional level, AA policies not only redistribute students in this way; they also add significantly to the total number of UREG students enrolling in degree programs. In the late 1990s, UREG members-i.e. African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Affirmative Action in the United States and India: A Comparative Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.