The Anglo-Japanese Alliance, 1902-22

By Phillips Payson O'Brien | Go to book overview

12

Japanese art and its effect on the Art Nouveau movement in Britain

Maggie Tatarkowski

The movement known as Art Nouveau appeared at the beginning of the 1890s and lasted until around the time of the First World War. Essentially it was of importance in Europe and North America and as a style it belonged not only in the sphere of working artists but also found champions in the world of commercialism. Jewellers and metalsmiths produced items, derived from the various influences behind the movement. Publishers availed themselves of its designs in advertising posters and in the illustrations with which they filled their books, while public institutions such as galleries and government offices used its images to help transmit information to the public. In retrospect, we can now appreciate that it was a movement which concerned itself, consciously, with the idea of the modern. Although we now see Art Nouveau as a style of its time, at that point it was a concerted attempt to alter the visual precepts of the age which spawned it. The Western world was moving, relentlessly, into the twentieth century, with its attendant expansionist ideas and commercial mass production. Art Nouveau, while happy to utilise the advances in production techniques in a variety of fields, nevertheless looked to the styles of other times and other places and, above all, to Nature herself to reawaken an interest in design and the essential poetry present in objects for everyday use in homes and public places. The art of previous European styles, such as the Gothic and the Baroque and the intricate patterns of Celtic design were called upon and reinterpreted to suit the new century, but styles from outside Europe were also invoked. Islamic art provided some inspiration but the art of Japan was a considerable influence in Art Nouveau's emerging style. 1 The resultant apparent simplicity of many of the movement's images and objects obscures the fact that the decoration of these items derives from a variety of sources and design concepts, drawn from different historical periods and geographic locations. This complex and diverse style fitted well, therefore, into the age of its flowering, which was one of the coming together of different nations and the sharing of concepts in the hope of creating a more vibrant age. The people who were responsible for the development of Art Nouveau and who worked within its ideas and objectives believed that all the arts should work together and in their unified approach there would be a kind of poetry. They believed that if everyday

-208-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anglo-Japanese Alliance, 1902-22
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.