Understanding Consumer Decision Making: The Means-End Approach to Marketing and Advertising Strategy

By Thomas J. Reynolds; Jerry C. Olson | Go to book overview

Finally, we believe that the area of laddering and MEC, in spite of this catalogue of problems, has the potential for making a very significant contribution to consumer research. It could evolve to the cognitive theory of consumer behavior, with a tool box of measurement devices developed to bridge the gap between construct and reality.


REFERENCES

Ajzen, I. (1985). From intentions to actions: A theory of planned behaviour. In J. Kuhl & J.Beckmann (Eds.), Action control: From cognition to behavior (pp. 11–39). Berlin, Germany: Springer.

Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980). Understanding attitudes and predicting behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Ajzen, I., & Madden, T. J. (1986). Prediction of goal-directed behavior: Attitudes, intentions, and perceived behavioral control. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 22, 453–474.

Anderson, J. R. (1983). The architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Asselbergs, P. (1989). Competitive advertising — New developments in qualitative positioning research: Meaning structure analysis. Rotterdam, Netherlands: IPM.

Aurifeille, J.-M. (1991). Contribution of 'instrumental values' to means-end chains analysis and to advertising conceptualization. Paper presented at Workshop on value and lifestyle research in marketing (pp.). Brussels, Belgium: EIASM.

Bagozzi, R. P., & Dabholkar, P. A. (1994). Consumer recycling goals and their effects on decisions to recycle: A means-end analysis. Psychology & Marketing, 11, 1–28.

Bech-Larsen, T., & Nielsen, N. A. (1999). A comparison of five elicitation techniques for elicitation of attributes of low involvement products. Journal of Economic Psychology, 20, 315–341.

Botschen, G., & Thelen, E. (1998). Hard versus soft laddering: Implications for appropriate use. In I. Balderjahn, C. Mennicken, & E. Vernette (Eds.), New developments and approaches in consumer behaviour research (pp. 321–339). Stuttgart: Schäffer-Poeschel.

Chang, T. M. (1986). Semantic memory: Facts and models. Psychological Bulletin, 99, 199–220.

Cowan, N. (1988). Evolving conceptions of memory storage, selective attention, and their mutual constraints within the human information processing system. Psychological Bulletin, 104, 163–191.

Deese, J. (1965). The structure of associations in language and thought. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins.

Dichter, E. (1960). The strategy of desire. New York: Doubleday.

Fishbein, M., & Ajzen, I. (1975). Belief, attitude, intention and behavior. Reading, MA: Addi-son-Wesley.

Gruenewald, P. J., & Lockhead, G. R. (1980). The free recall of category examples. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human learning and memory, 6(3), 225–240.

Grunert, K. G. (1982a). Informationsverarbeitungsprozesse bei der Kaufentscheidung: Ein gedächt-nispsychologischer Ansatz [Information processing in purchase decisions: A memory psychology perspective]. Frankfurt, Germany: Lang.

Grunert, K. G. (1982b). Linear processing in a semantic network: An alternative view of consumer product evaluation. Journal of Business Research, 10, 31–42.

Grunert, K. G. (1994). Cognition and economic psychology. In H. Brandstätter & W. Güth (Eds.), Essays in economic psychology (pp. 91–108). Berlin, Germany: Springer.

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Consumer Decision Making: The Means-End Approach to Marketing and Advertising Strategy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 447

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.