Understanding Consumer Decision Making: The Means-End Approach to Marketing and Advertising Strategy

By Thomas J. Reynolds; Jerry C. Olson | Go to book overview

7
The Application of the MECCAS Model to the
Development and Assessment of Advertising
Strategy: A Case Study
Thomas J. Reynolds
Strategic Research, Development and Assessment
Alyce Byrd Craddock
Federal Express Corporation
The identification of viable positioning opportunities is a critical problem for marketing managers. In a mature product class, or one in which products are not uniquely differentiable with respect to product characteristics, the task is particularly difficult. To develop a unique positioning for a product in a competitive, perceptually crowded marketplace, a manager needs research tools and an interpretative framework that helps:
1. Identify the perceptual orientations or segments that exist in the marketplace, including the personal motivations that provide the underlying basis for interpreting products or services.
2. Specify the product's current strategic position as well as that of its competitors.
3. Integrate the consumer perceptual information and the current assessment of strategic positionings into the identification, assessment, and choice of alternative strategies and communication.

The failure of most attempts to resolve this fundamental managerial problem is due to the lack of a framework that permits integration of both consumer research and advertising strategy specification. The problem is confounded by the fact that it is also extremely difficult to think divergently in the creation of new strategic positions. The ability to develop a meaningful set of advertising strategy options requires a framework that permits the strategist to generate alternatives that are grounded both in consumer perceptions and in the competitive environment of the marketplace.

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